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Profiling and imaging of tissues by imaging ion mobility-mass spectrometry

Authors

  • John A. McLean,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, Vanderbilt University, 7330 Stevenson Center, Nashville, TN 37235, USA
    • Department of Chemistry, Vanderbilt University, 7330 Stevenson Center, Nashville, TN 37335, USA.
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    • These authors contributed to an equal extent.

  • Whitney B. Ridenour,

    1. Department of Biochemistry and Mass Spectrometry Research Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 435 21st Avenue South, Nashville, TN 37232-8575 USA
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    • These authors contributed to an equal extent.

  • Richard M. Caprioli

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, Vanderbilt University, 7330 Stevenson Center, Nashville, TN 37235, USA
    2. Department of Biochemistry and Mass Spectrometry Research Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 435 21st Avenue South, Nashville, TN 37232-8575 USA
    • Department of Biochemistry, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 435 21st Avenue South, Nashville, TN 37232 USA.
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Abstract

Molecular profiling and imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) of tissues can often result in complex spectra that are difficult to interpret without additional information about specific signals. This report describes increasing data dimensionality in IMS by combining two-dimensional separations at each spatial location on the basis of imaging ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS). Analyte ions are separated on the basis of both ion-neutral collision cross section and m/z, which provides rapid separation of isobaric, but structurally distinct ions. The advantages of imaging using ion mobility prior to MS analysis are demonstrated for profiling of human glioma and selective lipid imaging from rat brain. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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