Macromolecular assembly of Helicobacter pylori urease investigated by mass spectrometry

Authors

  • Martijn W. H. Pinkse,

    1. Department of Biomolecular Mass Spectrometry, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research and Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht University, Sorbonnelaan 16, 3584 CA Utrecht, The Netherlands
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  • Claudia S. Maier,

    1. Department of Biomolecular Mass Spectrometry, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research and Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht University, Sorbonnelaan 16, 3584 CA Utrecht, The Netherlands
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  • Jung-In Kim,

    1. National Creative Research Initiative Center for Biomolecular Recognition, Department of Life Science and Division of Molecular and Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Kyungbuk, 790-784, Korea
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  • Byung-Ha Oh,

    1. National Creative Research Initiative Center for Biomolecular Recognition, Department of Life Science and Division of Molecular and Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Kyungbuk, 790-784, Korea
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  • Albert J. R. Heck

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biomolecular Mass Spectrometry, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research and Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht University, Sorbonnelaan 16, 3584 CA Utrecht, The Netherlands
    • Department of Biomolecular Mass Spectrometry, Utrecht University, Sorbonnelaan 16, 3584 CA Utrecht, The Netherlands.
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Abstract

The supramolecular assembly of Helicobacter pylori urease was studied by nanoflow electrospray ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The measured molecular mass of the urease complex of 1.06 MDa corresponds to a dodecameric (αβ)12 assembly of urease α (26 kDa) and β (61 kDa) subunits. The dodecamer disassembles readily into (αβ)3 subunits in solution and under controlled collisional-induced dissociation in the gas phase. This is in strong support of an ((αβ)3)4 architecture consistent with the recently published x-ray structure. In vitro, the α and β subunits are capable of re-assembling to (αβ)3, but not further to the dodecameric complex. Copyright © 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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