Oral famciclovir against duck hepatitis B virus replication in hepatic and nonhepatic tissues of ducklings infected in ovo

Authors

  • Kwesi N. Tsiquaye,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Clinical Sciences, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, England
    • Department of Clinical Sciences, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, England
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  • Marek J. Slornka,

    1. Department of Clinical Sciences, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, England
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  • Mala Maung

    1. Department of Clinical Sciences, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, England
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Abstract

Detection of hepadnaviral DMA in extrahepatic tissues of human and animal models of hepatitis B virus (HBV) has raised the question of whether virus replication in organs other than the liver could be targeted for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B. Since duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) replication is dynamic in the liver, kidney, pancreas, and spleen of newly hatched ducklings infected in ovo, we used the duck model and the new antiherpesvirus agent, famciclovir (FCV), to determine whether antiviral effect of nucleoside analogues on DHBV replication is pluripotential. Day-old ducklings hatched from eggs laid by a DHBV-carrier duck were bled and administered FCV (25 mg/kg/bd) orally for periods of 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, and 12 days. Seventeen (17) hours after the last dose of each regimen the duckling(s) was bled and postmortem samples of liver, kidney, pancreas, and spleen were snap-frozen and stored at −70°. Analysis of plasma samples of ducklings treated for 2 days and longer by dot-blot hybridisation showed that levels of DHBV DNA were reduced significantly compared to levels in samples collected before treatment begun. Southern blot hybridisation of tissue DNA corroborated these results and showed that DHBV DNA replicative intermediates in all the tissues examined were reduced to levels that reflected the amount of virus released into the blood of each treated duckling. It is concluded from these results that if antiviral agents could be transformed to active metabolites in any infected tissues including the liver, replication of hepadnaviruses would be inhibited. We also note that the ability of young ducklings to metabolise FCV to the parent compound, penciclovir, suggests that hatchlings could be used for screening antiviral compounds under development. © 1994 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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