Association of viral factors with non-familial breast cancer in Taiwan by comparison with non-cancerous, fibroadenoma, and thyroid tumor tissues

Authors

  • Ju-Hsin Tsai,

    1. Department of Surgery, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Chung-Hung Tsai,

    1. Department of Pathology, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Min-Hsiung Cheng,

    1. Department of Anatomy, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Shyh-Jye Lin,

    1. School of Medical Technology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Fang-Ling Xu,

    1. School of Medical Technology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
    2. Institute of Virology, Medical School, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Chi-Chiang Yang

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Medical Technology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
    2. Institute of Virology, Medical School, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, China
    • School of Medical Technology, Chung Shan Medical University, 110, Section 1, Chien-Kuo North Road, Taichung 402, Taiwan.
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Dr. Chi-Chiang Yang is a visiting Professor, Institute of Virology, Medical School, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, China.

Abstract

To study the etiologic factors of non-familial breast cancer, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern hybridization were used to detect six viruses including human papillomavirus (HPV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1, HSV-2, and human herpesvirus (HHV)-8 DNA in 69 patients with breast cancer and 60 specimens from non-cancerous or other individuals with thyroid tumors or fibroadenoma (non-breast cancer controls). Two specimens from patients with a familial history of breast cancer and five breast cancer specimens with negative results for β-globin, which was used as internal control, were excluded from this study. Eight (12.9%) HSV-1, 28 (45.2%) EBV, 47 (75.8%) CMV, 8 (12.9%) HPV, and 28 (45.2%) HHV-8 positive samples out of the 62 breast cancer specimens were detected; no HSV-2 DNA was detected in any group. Among the viral gene-positive breast cancer samples, 12 (23.1%) were positive for 1 virus, 16 (30.8%) were positive for 2 viruses, 21 (40.4%) were positive for 3 viruses, and 3 (5.8%) were positive for 4 viruses. Among the viral gene-positive specimens of the control groups, only one virus, CMV, was found in the non-cancerous and thyroid tumor specimens, while multiple viruses were found in the fibroadenoma specimens. The viruses associated with breast cancer were HHV-8 > EBV (P < 0.01). The viruses associated with fibroadenoma were HSV-1 and HHV-8 > EBV (P < 0.01). The presence of more than one virus was found predominantly in breast cancer and exclusively found in fibroadenoma. CMV was the only virus associated with thyroid tumors. J. Med. Virol. 75:276–281, 2005. © 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Ancillary