Hepatitis B virus genotypes in children and adolescents in Japan: Before and after immunization for the prevention of mother to infant transmission of hepatitis B virus

Authors

  • Ayano Inui,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pediatrics, Yokohama Sakae Kyosai Hospital, Katsura-cho 132, Sakae-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan
    Current affiliation:
    1. Division of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Medical Center for Child Health and Development, Saiseikai Yokohama Tobu Hospital, Shimosueyoshi 3-6-1, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan.
    • Department of Pediatrics, Yokohama Sakae Kyosai Hospital, Katsura-cho 132, Sakae-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan.
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  • Haruki Komatsu,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Sakura Hospital, Toho University School of Medicine, Shimoshizu 564-1, Sakura, Chiba, Japan
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  • Tsuyoshi Sogo,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Yokohama Sakae Kyosai Hospital, Katsura-cho 132, Sakae-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan
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  • Toshiro Nagai,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Koshigaya Hospital, Dokkyo Medical School, Minami-koshigaya, 2-1-50, Koshigaya, Saitama, Japan
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  • Kenji Abe,

    1. Department of Pathology, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Toyama 1-23-1, Shinjyuku, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Tomoo Fujisawa

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Atami Hospital, International University of Health and Welfare, Higashi-kaigan-cho 13-1, Atami, Shizuoka, Japan
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Abstract

The genotype distribution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) was investigated in 118 children in Japan. One hundred and sixteen children (98%) had chronic HBV infection, and the remainder had acute hepatitis. Genotyping of HBV was determined by PCR and sequencing analysis in the S gene. Genotype C (86%) was the most frequent, followed by genotype B (9%), D (2.5%), and A (1.0%). Transmission routes of HBV to children were from mothers in 91 patients (77%), fathers in 8 (6.5%), mother or father in 1 (1%), family members other than the parents in 5 (4%), and unknown in 13 (11.5%). The relationship between routes of HBV transmission and HBV genotypes was studied. Eighty-eight (97%) of 91 children of mother-to-infant transmission were genotype C, while 13 (49%) of 27 children of the routes other than the mother to infant transmission were genotype C. The number of children with genotype C who were infected from their mothers was significantly higher than those with genotype B, D, or A (P < 0.01). In conclusion, HBV genotypes influence not only clinical characteristics but also the mechanisms of inter-personal HBV transmission. J. Med. Virol. 79: 670–675, 2007. © 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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