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Toll-like receptor 3 polymorphism and its association with hepatitis B virus infection in Saudi Arabian patients

Authors

  • Ahmed Al-Qahtani,

    1. Department of Infection and Immunity, Research Center, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    2. Liver Disease Research Center, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
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  • Mohammed Al-Ahdal,

    1. Department of Infection and Immunity, Research Center, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    2. Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
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  • Ayman Abdo,

    1. Liver Disease Research Center, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    2. Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
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  • Faisal Sanai,

    1. Liver Disease Research Center, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    2. Department of Hepatobiliary Science and Liver Transplantation, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
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  • Mashael Al-Anazi,

    1. Department of Infection and Immunity, Research Center, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
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  • Nisreen Khalaf,

    1. Department of Infection and Immunity, Research Center, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
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  • Nisha A. Viswan,

    1. Department of Infection and Immunity, Research Center, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
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  • Hamad Al-Ashgar,

    1. Department of Medicine, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
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  • Hind Al-Humaidan,

    1. Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
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  • Riham Al-Suwayeh,

    1. Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
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  • Zahid Hussain,

    1. Center of Excellence in Biotechnology Research, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
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  • Saud Alarifi,

    1. Center of Excellence in Biotechnology Research, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    2. Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
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  • Majid Al-Okail,

    1. Center of Excellence in Biotechnology Research, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    2. Department of Biochemistry, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
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  • Fahad N. Almajhdi

    Corresponding author
    1. Center of Excellence in Biotechnology Research, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    2. Department of Botany and Microbiology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    • Department of Botany and Microbiology, College of Sciences, King Saudi University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
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Abstract

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the major causative agent of chronic liver complications including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Individuals infected with HBV show a wide spectrum of disease manifestations ranging from asymptomatic carriers to HCC. TLR3 is part of the innate immune system that recognizes double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and provides early immune response to exogenous antigens. The genetic polymorphisms such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the TLR3 could be considered as factors for the susceptibility to viral pathogens including HBV. Due to lack of knowledge on the role of TLR3 polymorphisms in HBV infection, this study investigated the distribution of nine SNPs in the TLR3 gene and its association with Saudi Arabian patients infected with HBV. A total of 707 patients and 600 uninfected controls were examined for different parameters including the nine SNPs (rs5743311, rs5743312, rs1879026, rs5743313, rs5743314, rs5743315, rs111611328, rs78726532 and a newly identified SNP located at position 184322913 of chr4). The association analysis confirmed that only one SNP, rs1879026 (G/T), showed a significant difference (P = 0.0480; OR = 0.809, 95% CI = 0.655–0.999) in the distribution between HBV carriers and uninfected controls. While, the rest of the SNPs showed no significant association with regards to HBV infection or in the progression to cirrhosis of the liver and HCC. Furthermore, haplotype analysis revealed that one haplotype GCGA (rs1879026, rs5743313, rs5743314, and rs5743315, respectively), was associated significantly with HBV infection in this population. These findings indicate that genetic variations in the TLR3 gene could affect the outcome of HBV infection among Saudis. J. Med. Virol. 84:1353–1359, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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