Circulating microRNA-22 correlates with microRNA-122 and represents viral replication and liver injury in patients with chronic hepatitis B

Authors

  • Keiko Arataki,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Applied Life Sciences, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
    2. Laboratory for Digestive Diseases, Center for Genomic Medicine, RIKEN, Hiroshima, Japan
    3. Liver Research Project Center, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
    4. Tsuchiya General Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan
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  • C. Nelson Hayes,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Applied Life Sciences, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
    2. Laboratory for Digestive Diseases, Center for Genomic Medicine, RIKEN, Hiroshima, Japan
    3. Liver Research Project Center, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
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  • Sakura Akamatsu,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Applied Life Sciences, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
    2. Laboratory for Digestive Diseases, Center for Genomic Medicine, RIKEN, Hiroshima, Japan
    3. Liver Research Project Center, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
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  • Rie Akiyama,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Applied Life Sciences, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
    2. Laboratory for Digestive Diseases, Center for Genomic Medicine, RIKEN, Hiroshima, Japan
    3. Liver Research Project Center, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
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  • Hiromi Abe,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Applied Life Sciences, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
    2. Laboratory for Digestive Diseases, Center for Genomic Medicine, RIKEN, Hiroshima, Japan
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  • Masataka Tsuge,

    1. Liver Research Project Center, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
    2. Natural Science Center for Basic Research and Development, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
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  • Daiki Miki,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Applied Life Sciences, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
    2. Laboratory for Digestive Diseases, Center for Genomic Medicine, RIKEN, Hiroshima, Japan
    3. Liver Research Project Center, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
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  • Hidenori Ochi,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Applied Life Sciences, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
    2. Laboratory for Digestive Diseases, Center for Genomic Medicine, RIKEN, Hiroshima, Japan
    3. Liver Research Project Center, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
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  • Nobuhiko Hiraga,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Applied Life Sciences, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
    2. Laboratory for Digestive Diseases, Center for Genomic Medicine, RIKEN, Hiroshima, Japan
    3. Liver Research Project Center, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
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  • Michio Imamura,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Applied Life Sciences, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
    2. Laboratory for Digestive Diseases, Center for Genomic Medicine, RIKEN, Hiroshima, Japan
    3. Liver Research Project Center, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
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  • Shoichi Takahashi,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Applied Life Sciences, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
    2. Laboratory for Digestive Diseases, Center for Genomic Medicine, RIKEN, Hiroshima, Japan
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  • Hiroshi Aikata,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Applied Life Sciences, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
    2. Liver Research Project Center, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
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  • Tomokazu Kawaoka,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Applied Life Sciences, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
    2. Laboratory for Digestive Diseases, Center for Genomic Medicine, RIKEN, Hiroshima, Japan
    3. Liver Research Project Center, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
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  • Hiroiku Kawakami,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Applied Life Sciences, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
    2. Laboratory for Digestive Diseases, Center for Genomic Medicine, RIKEN, Hiroshima, Japan
    3. Liver Research Project Center, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
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  • Waka Ohishi,

    1. Liver Research Project Center, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
    2. Department of Clinical Studies, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima, Japan
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  • Kazuaki Chayama

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Applied Life Sciences, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
    2. Laboratory for Digestive Diseases, Center for Genomic Medicine, RIKEN, Hiroshima, Japan
    3. Liver Research Project Center, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan
    • Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Applied Life Sciences, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-Ku, Hiroshima 734-8551, Japan.
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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Erratum Article first published online: 20 November 2015

  • Conflict of interest: The authors who have taken part in this study declare that they have nothing to disclose regarding funding or conflict of interest with respect to this manuscript.

Abstract

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is associated with increased expression of microRNA-122. Serum microRNA-122 and microRNA-22 levels were analyzed in 198 patients with chronic HBV who underwent liver biopsy and were compared with quantitative measurements of HBsAg, HBeAg, HBV DNA, and other clinical and histological findings. Levels of serum microRNA-122 and microRNA-22 were determined by reverse transcription-TaqMan PCR. Serum levels of microRNA-122 and microRNA-22 were correlated (R2 = 0.576; P < 0.001), and both were elevated in chronic HBV patients. Significant linear correlations were found between microRNA-122 or microRNA-22 and HBsAg levels (R2 = 0.824, P < 0.001 and R2 = 0.394, P < 0.001, respectively) and ALT levels (R2 = 0.498, P < 0.001 and R2 = 0.528, P < 0.001, respectively). MicroRNA-122 levels were also correlated with HBV DNA titers (R2 = 0.694, P < 0.001 and R2 = 0.421, P < 0.001). Levels of these microRNAs were significantly higher in HBeAg-positive patients compared to HBeAg-negative patients (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001). MicroRNA-122 levels were also lower in patients with advanced liver fibrosis (P < 0.001) and lower inflammatory activity (P < 0.025). These results suggest that serum micro-RNA levels are significantly associated with multiple aspects of HBV infection. The biological meaning of the correlation between microRNA-122 and HBsAg and should be investigated further. J. Med. Virol. 85:789–798, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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