Expression and regulation of golli products of myelin basic protein gene during in vitro development of oligodendrocytes

Authors

  • Maria I. Givogri,

    1. Developmental Biology Group, Mental Retardation Research Center, School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles
    Current affiliation:
    1. Neurobiochemistry Group, Mental Retardation Research Center, UCLA, 760 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90024
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  • Ernesto R. Bongarzone,

    1. Developmental Biology Group, Mental Retardation Research Center, School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles
    Current affiliation:
    1. Neurobiochemistry Group, Mental Retardation Research Center, UCLA, 760 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90024
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  • V. Schonmann,

    1. Developmental Biology Group, Mental Retardation Research Center, School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles
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  • Anthony T. Campagnoni

    Corresponding author
    1. Developmental Biology Group, Mental Retardation Research Center, School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles
    • Mental Retardation Research Center, Neuropsychiatric Institute, UCLA School of Medicine, 760 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90024
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Abstract

The myelin basic protein (MBP) gene produces two families of proteins, the classic MBPs, important for myelination of the CNS, and the golli proteins, whose biological role in oligodendrocytes (OLs) is still unknown. The goals of this work were to study the in vitro pattern of expression of the golli products during OL differentiation and to compare it with that of the classic MBP products of the gene. Mouse primary glial cultures were analyzed at the mRNA and protein levels with an array of techniques. We found that OLs express golli mRNA primarily during intermediate stages of differentiation, which was confirmed by immunocytochemical analysis. Golli expression was low in proliferating OL progenitors as well as in terminally mature OLs. Golli proteins were found associated with the OL cell soma and nuclei and, to a lesser extent, with the cellular processes. We also found that golli proteins are not targeted to myelin in vitro and in vivo, in contrast to the classic MBPs. Finally, we found that golli expression is regulated during OL development and can be manipulated by growth factors such as basic fibroblast growth factor, neurotrophin-3, and retinoic acid. J. Neurosci. Res. 66:679–690, 2001. © 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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