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Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor–secreting genetically modified human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote recovery in a rat model of Parkinson's disease

Authors

  • Aleksandra Glavaski-Joksimovic,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Neurobiology Program, Children's Memorial Research Center, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois
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  • Tamas Virag,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Neurobiology Program, Children's Memorial Research Center, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois
    Current affiliation:
    1. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, MD
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  • Thomas A. Mangatu,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Neurobiology Program, Children's Memorial Research Center, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois
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  • Michael McGrogan,

    1. SanBio, Inc., Mountain View, California
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  • Xue Song Wang,

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Neurobiology Program, Children's Memorial Research Center, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois
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  • Martha C. Bohn

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pediatrics, Neurobiology Program, Children's Memorial Research Center, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois
    • Medical Research Institute Council Professor, Director, Neurobiology Program, Children's Memorial Research Center (CMRC), Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, 2300 Children's Plaza, Box 209, Chicago, IL 60614
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Abstract

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) neurons. The therapeutic potential of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), the most potent neurotrophic factor for DA neurons, has been demonstrated in many experimental models of PD. However, chronic delivery of GDNF to DA neurons in the brain remains an unmet challenge. Here, we report the effects of GDNF-releasing Notch-induced human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) grafted into striatum of the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) progressively lesioned rat model of PD. Human MSC, obtained from bone marrow aspirates of young, healthy adult volunteers, were transiently transfected with the intracellular domain of the Notch1 gene (NICD) to generate SB623 cells. SB623 cells expressing GDNF and/or humanized Renilla green fluorescent protein (hrGFP) following lentiviral transduction or nontransduced cells were stereotaxically placed into rat striatum 1 week after a unilateral partial 6-OHDA striatal lesion. At 4 weeks, rats that had received GDNF-transduced SB623 cells had significantly decreased amphetamine-induced rotation compared with control rats, although this effect was not observed in rats that received GFP-transduced or nontransduced SB623 cells. At 5 weeks, rejuvenated tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-IR) fibers that appeared to be host DA axons were observed in and around grafts. This effect was more prominent in rats that received GDNF-secreting cells and was not observed in controls. These observations suggest that human bone-marrow derived MSC, genetically modified to secrete GDNF, hold potential as an allogeneic or autologous stem cell therapy for PD. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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