Establishment of pure neuronal cultures from fetal rat spinal cord and proliferation of the neuronal precursor cells in the presence of fibroblast growth factor

Authors

  • Dr. J. C. Deloulme,

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratoire de Neurobiologie Ontogénique, Centre de Neurochimie, CNRS, Strasbourg, France
    • Laboratoire de Neurobiologie Ontogénique, Centre de Neurochimie, CNRS, 5, rue Blaise Pascal, 67084 Strasbourg CEDEX, France
    Search for more papers by this author
  • J. Baudier,

    1. Laboratoire de Neurobiologie Ontogénique, Centre de Neurochimie, CNRS, Strasbourg, France
    Search for more papers by this author
  • M. Sensenbrenner

    1. Laboratoire de Neurobiologie Ontogénique, Centre de Neurochimie, CNRS, Strasbourg, France
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

A primary culture system of nearly pure neuronal cells from 14-day-old fetal rat spinal cord has been developed by combining a preplating step, the use of a chemically defined serum-free medium, and bo-rated polylysine-coated dishes that prevented the formation of cell aggregates. About 98% of the cells were found to be immunostained with neuron-specific enolase antibodies, confirming their neuronal nature. The cultures are composed essentially of a population of non-motoneurons and contain few motoneurons, characterized by their large size and multipolar aspect, the presence of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and the intense immunoreaction for growth-associated protein GAP-43. Neuronal precursor cells are also present in these cultures and proliferate during the first 3 days. The addition of bovine brain basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) stimulates their proliferation over a period of 2 days, as determined, by measurement of [125I]iododeoxyuridine incorporation and by immunocytochemical reaction after bro-modeoxyuridine incorporation into nuclei. The proliferating cells were characterized as neurons by immunostaining against neuron-specific enolase. Re-combinant human bFGF and bovine brain acidic FGF (aFGF) exerted similar effects. Other growth factors, including epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor β1 (TFG-β1), and thrombin, were without effect on the proliferative activity of these neuronal cells. bFGF has no effect on the survival of motoneurons and on the fiber outgrowth of the whole neuronal population. However, bFGF affects the development of bipolar AChE-pos-itive neurons, probably belonging to the non-motoneuron population. The data indicate that bFGF and aFGF are mitogens for neuroblasts from rat spinal cord in culture and that bFGF influences the development of a subpopulation of spinal neurons that are AChE-positive.

Ancillary