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How does spouse career support relate to employee turnover? Work interfering with family and job satisfaction as mediators

Authors

  • Ann H. Huffman,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychology and W. A. Franke College of Business, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona, U.S.A.
    • Correpondence to: Ann H. Huffman, Department of Psychology and W. A. Franke College of Business, Northern Arizona University, Box 15106, Flagstaff, Arizona 86011, U.S.A. E-mail: ann.huffman@nau.edu

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  • Wendy J. Casper,

    1. College of Business Administration, Department of Management, The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas, U.S.A.
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  • Stephanie C. Payne

    1. Department of Psychology, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, U.S.A.
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  • Correction added on 10 May 2013 after first publication online on 15 April 2013. Due to an error, the ordering of the author names originally appeared in this article as Huffman, Payne and Casper, instead of the correct order of Huffman, Casper and Payne. This error has been corrected in this version of the article.

Summary

Employee turnover is a major concern because of its cost to organizations. Although theory supports the influence of nonwork factors on turnover, our understanding of the degree to which nonwork factors relate to actual turnover behavior is not well developed. Using a sample of 5505 U.S. Army officers, we assessed the extent to which spouse career support related to reduced turnover four years later through work interfering with family (WIF) and job satisfaction as mechanisms. Results revealed that spouse career support decreased the odds of turnover, and WIF and job satisfaction sequentially mediated this relationship, with lower WIF and higher job satisfaction reducing the odds of turnover. Practical implications of using family support systems as retention interventions are discussed. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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