Examining the influence of climate, supervisor guidance, and behavioral integrity on work–family conflict: A demands and resources approach

Authors

  • Samantha C. Paustian-Underdahl,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Management and Marketing, Culverhouse College of Commerce and Business Administration, The University Of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, U.S.A.
    • Correspondence to: Samantha C. Paustian-Underdahl, Department of Management and Marketing, Culverhouse College of Commerce and Business Administration, The University Of Alabama, 361 Stadium Drive, Box 870225, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487-0225, U.S.A. E-mail: spaustian@cba.ua.edu

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  • Jonathon R. B. Halbesleben

    1. Department of Management and Marketing, Culverhouse College of Commerce and Business Administration, The University Of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, U.S.A.
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Summary

In this study, we assess a multilevel approach to work interference with family (WIF) by examining the influence of unit-level work–family climate, as well as the importance of supervisors' spoken guidance and their behavioral integrity in helping employees process social information about work–family issues. We propose that there are two important ways in which supervisors may influence their subordinates' WIF—through their spoken guidance regarding managing work–family conflict and through their behavioral integrity—employee perceptions of the degree to which supervisors' spoken work–family guidance aligns with their behaviors to help employees manage work and family on the job. Results from a sample of 628 employees of a health system, using path analytic tests of moderated mediation, provide support for the mediated effect of family-supportive climate on employee work–family conflict (through supervisory work–family guidance) and for a second-stage moderation in which the effect of guidance on WIF is stronger (weaker) when employees perceive high (low) levels of supervisor work–family behavioral integrity. We discuss the implications of these findings for the study of family-supportive work environments and work–family conflict. Limitations of this study and directions for future research are also presented. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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