SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

Keywords:

  • social identity;
  • identity management;
  • religion;
  • cross-cultural

Summary

Identity management refers to the decisions individuals make about how they present their social identities to others. We examined cross-cultural differences in distancing and affirming identity management strategies of Christian-identified employees utilizing samples from the USA and South Korea. Religious centrality, risks of disclosure, pressure to assimilate to organizational norms, and nation were key antecedents of chosen identity management strategies. Risks of disclosure and pressure to assimilate related to more distancing and less affirming strategies when religious centrality was low, but nation served as a boundary condition for the moderating effects of religious centrality. Distancing strategies related to negative outcomes regardless of religious centrality, but affirming strategies only related to positive outcomes when religious centrality was low. We discuss how this work contributes to theoretical and practical understanding of identity management in the workplace and across cultures. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.