Legal standards, ethical standards, and responses to social–sexual conduct at work

Authors

  • Charles A. Pierce,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Management, Fogelman College of Business and Economics, University of Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee, U.S.A.
    • Department of Management, Fogelman College of Business and Economics, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152-3120, U.S.A.
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  • Herman Aguinis

    1. The Business School, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, Denver, Colorado, U.S.A.
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  • A previous version of this article was presented as part of a symposium (R. L. Wiener, Chair) at the meeting of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Los Angeles, April 2005.

Abstract

When individuals investigate a sexual harassment claim that stems from a dissolved workplace romance, their responses to the claim are likely influenced by their ethical standards and legal standards. We propose a person–situation interactionist decision-making process through which investigators' ethical standards may override legal standards when responding to social–sexual conduct at work. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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