Life events and hassles as predictors of health symptoms, job performance, and absenteeism

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Abstract

Research on life events plays a prominent role in the stress literature. Unfortunately, cumulative life events have been found to positively correlate only weakly with health (Rabkin and Struening, 1976) and academic performance outcomes (Lloyd et al., 1980). The present study of 185 hourly employees examined the relationship of life events, daily hassles, and daily uplifts to general health symptoms, job performance, and absenteeism. Multiple regression analysis revealed that hassle frequency and intensity accounted for a significant portion of the variance in general health symptoms, with life events adding little to the variance explanation. Regression analysis also indicated that uplift frequency and intensity accounted for a significant portion of the variance in job performance and absenteeism. The present results suggest that additional organizational research on hassles and uplifts seems warranted when studying predictors of health symptoms, performance, and absenteeism.

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