SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

Abstract

A sample of 141 Canadian business school graduates responded to questionnaires at 3, 9 and 14 months after beginning full-time jobs. Their job experiences including challenge, work group fit, supervisor support, and mentorship were measured along with organizational commitment, turnover, and promotion. There was little evidence of treatment discrimination against the female and minority members of the sample. However, dissimilarity to one's work group in terms of age, education, and lifestyle meant lower job challenge and poorer work group fit. In contrast, being dissimilar in terms of gender meant greater challenge, and, if the manager was male, greater likelihood of promotion. Being dissimilar in terms of culture was not associated with any of the job experiences. Relationships between the early experiences and organizational commitment were strongest for those who were most dissimilar in terms of gender, whereas relationships between the experiences and turnover were strongest for those who were most dissimilar in terms of age, education, and lifestyle.