Evaluating the core: Critical assessment of core self-evaluations theory

Authors


Gilad Chen, Robert H. Smith, School of Business, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-1815, U.S.A. E-mail: giladchen@rhsmith.umd.edu

Summary

In 1997, Judge, Locke, and Durham published the core self-evaluations (CSE) theory proposing that a multidimensional CSE construct, composed of emotional stability, self-esteem, locus of control, and generalized self-efficacy, accounts for individual differences in job satisfaction as well as in other organizational behavior outcomes. In this article, I argue that, despite ample evidence in support of the predictive validity of the CSE construct, the adequacy of including emotional stability, self-esteem, locus of control, and generalized self-efficacy as indicators of the CSE construct may be questionable, and I review evidence that points to limited convergent and discriminant validity of the CSE construct. I conclude the article with a few recommendations for advancing CSE theory and research. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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