Rainfall regime in Three Gorges area in China and the control factors

Authors

  • Zhao Fang,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Resources, Environment and Geography, College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, People's Republic of China
    • Department of Geography, Building 28, Room 258, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Deng Hang,

    1. Department of Resources, Environment and Geography, College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, People's Republic of China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Zhao Xinyi

    1. Department of Resources, Environment and Geography, College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, People's Republic of China
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

A set of daily precipitation data from 1958 to 2007 was analysed for the area in and around the Three Gorges Reservoir Region. Annual and monthly precipitation, number of rainy days (NRDs), precipitation intensity (INT), and seven indices of extreme precipitation and drought were examined. Correlation between circulation indices and climate parameters was analysed. Significant decreases were detected in spring, fall, winter and annual NRDs, while significant increases were found in precipitation INT. Inter-decadal changes are obvious, it was wettest in the early 1980s, and dry in the first few years and after 1990. No significant changes are found in extreme precipitation/drought events, but a closer examination suggested they might become more frequent after 1980. Precipitation totals and days of extreme precipitation in a specific period were found to be negatively correlated with western North Pacific Monsoon Index (WNPMI); positively correlated with summer average of index of the ridge of western Pacific subtropical high; and positively correlated with summer average of index of INT of western Pacific subtropical high and the winter–summer difference of Tibetan Plateau (TP) index. These links were significant but not strong, which might manifest the characteristics of Three Gorges Area as a transition zone, where precipitation is influenced by multiple systems. Regional management should be more careful to adjust to these changes. Copyright © 2009 Royal Meteorological Society

Ancillary