Opposite trends in summer precipitation in South and North Korea

Authors

  • Yeonjoo Kim,

    1. Korea Adaptation Center for Climate Change, Korea Environment Institute, Eunpyeong-gu, Seoul, Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
    • [Correction added 23 April 2012 after original online publication: the name of the first author has been written out in full as ‘Yeonjoo Kim’.]

  • B. Kang,

    1. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Dankook University, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do, Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • J. M. Adams

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Biological Sciences, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151, Korea
    • School of Biological Sciences, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151, Korea.
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

We analysed daily precipitation data at the rain gauge stations in North Korea over a period of 25 years from 1983 to 2007, and in South Korea over a period of 35 years from 1973 and 2007. We found a striking trend of decreasing summer precipitation across North Korea. By contrast, in South Korea, the trend is opposite: there is a major increase in summer precipitation. Also, the number of dry days in summer showed an increasing trend in North Korea and a decreasing trend in South Korea. For the number of days with heavy precipitation (i.e. days with above 50 mm/day daily precipitation) during summer, a decreasing trend was detected in North Korea, but no trend in South Korea. However, in South Korea, there was a significant increase of days with heavy precipitation over the whole year. These opposite trends in summer precipitation between North and South Korea were further confirmed using four global/regional satellite and rain gauge datasets of CPC Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP), the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP), Precipitation REConstruction over the Land (PREC/L), and the Asian Precipitation-Highly Resolved Observation Data Integration Towards the Evaluation of Water Resources (APHRODITE). Copyright © 2011 Royal Meteorological Society

Ancillary