Interaction between intrinsic knee mechanics and the knee extensor mechanism

Authors

  • Dr. L. F. Draganich,

    1. Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rush-Presbyterian–St. Luke's Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.
    Current affiliation:
    1. Section of Orthopaedics, Department of Surgery, University of Chicago Medcial Center, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, Box #421, Chicago, IL 60637, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dr. T. P. Andriacchi,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rush-Presbyterian–St. Luke's Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.
    • Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rush-Presbyterian–St. Luke's Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60612, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • G. B. J. Andersson

    1. Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rush-Presbyterian–St. Luke's Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

The ability of the quadriceps muscles to extend the knee was studied relative to the intrinsic mechanical features of the knee joint. The quadriceps mechanical efficiency changed by nearly 50% between 0 and 90° of knee flexion. The peak efficiency occurred at ∼20° of knee flexion. The mechanical efficiency of the quadriceps was dependent on the movement of the net anteroposterior (AP) tibiofemoral contact center of pressure, the change in patellar ligament angle, and the change in the quadriceps-to-ligament force transfer ratio. The average net AP tibiofemoral contact center of pressure moved posteriorly on the tibial plateau as the knee flexed from 0 to 90°. The excision of both cruciate ligaments reversed the posteriorly directed movement of the net AP tibiofemoral contact center of pressure at flexion angles from 60 to 90°, resulting in a reduction in extension moment.

Ancillary