Effects of Aporrectodea caliginosa (Savigny) on nitrogen mobilization and decomposition of elevated-CO2 Charlock mustard litter

Authors

  • Sven Marhan,

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute of Soil Science and Land Evaluation, Soil Biology Section, University of Hohenheim; Emil-Wolff-Str. 27, 70599 Stuttgart, Germany
    • Institute of Soil Science and Land Evaluation, Soil Biology Section, University of Hohenheim; Emil-Wolff-Str. 27, 70599 Stuttgart, Germany
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  • Franziska Rempt,

    1. Institute of Soil Science and Land Evaluation, Soil Biology Section, University of Hohenheim; Emil-Wolff-Str. 27, 70599 Stuttgart, Germany
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  • Petra Högy,

    1. Institute of Landscape and Plant Ecology, Plant Ecology and Ecotoxicology Section, University of Hohenheim; August-v. Hartmann Str. 3, 70599 Stuttgart, Germany
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  • Andreas Fangmeier,

    1. Institute of Landscape and Plant Ecology, Plant Ecology and Ecotoxicology Section, University of Hohenheim; August-v. Hartmann Str. 3, 70599 Stuttgart, Germany
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  • Ellen Kandeler

    1. Institute of Soil Science and Land Evaluation, Soil Biology Section, University of Hohenheim; Emil-Wolff-Str. 27, 70599 Stuttgart, Germany
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Abstract

This study was conducted to improve our understanding of how earthworms and microorganisms interact in the decomposition of litter of low quality (high C : N ratio) grown under elevated atmospheric [CO2]. A microcosm approach was used to investigate the influence of endogeic earthworm (Aporrectodea caliginosa Savigny) activity on the decomposition of senescent Charlock mustard (Sinapis arvensis L.) litter produced under ambient and elevated [CO2]. Earthworms and microorganisms were exposed to litter which had changed in quality (C : N ratio) while growing under elevated [CO2]. After 50 d of incubation in microcosms, C mineralization (CO2 production) in the treatment with elevated-[CO2] litter was significantly lower in comparison to the ambient-[CO2] litter treatment. The input of Charlock mustard litter into the soil generally induced N immobilization and reduced N2O-emission rates from soil. Earthworm activity enhanced CO2 production, but there was no relationship to litter quality. Although earthworm biomass was not affected by the lower quality of the elevated-[CO2] litter, soil microbial biomass (Cmic, Nmic) was significantly decreased. Earthworms reduced Cmic and fungal biomass, the latter only in treatments without litter. Our study clearly showed that A. caliginosa used the litter grown under different [CO2] independent of its quality and that their effect on the litter-decomposition process was also independent of litter quality. Soil microorganisms were shown to negatively react to small changes in Charlock mustard litter quality; therefore we expect that microbially mediated C and N cycling may change under future atmospheric [CO2].

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