Exploring the Role of Valence and Regulation Type on the Emotional Antecedents of Burnout

Authors

  • Kathryn Packell MA,

    1. University of Tulsa
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    • Kathryn Packell, MA, is a doctoral candidate in industrial/organizational psychology at the University of Tulsa. She earned her BS degree (2007) in psychology and Spanish from Rollins College and obtained her MA in industrial/organizational psychology from the University of Tulsa in May 2011. Her current research focuses on emotional experiences at work and their effects on organizationally relevant stress outcomes and job attitudes. Other areas of interest include the work–nonwork interface, individual and organizational stress management, and personality in the workplace. She may be reached at kathryn-packell@utulsa.edu

  • Anupama Narayan PhD

    1. University of Tulsa
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    • Anupama Narayan, PhD, is an assistant professor of industrial/organizational psychology in the Department of Psychology at the University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma. She received her PhD in industrial/organizational psychology from Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio, in 2008. Her main research areas are work teams, motivation, and organizational climate. Other areas of interest include training and development, the work–nonwork interface, and personality in the workplace. She may be reached at Anupama-narayan@utulsa.edu


Abstract

We examined the predictive relationships between distinct types of emotional regulation and psychological burnout in a sample of 85 practicing nurse professionals. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to predict emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and reduced professional efficacy from the genuine expression, faking, and suppression of discrete positive and negative emotions. The genuine expression of negative emotions predicted emotional exhaustion, and the genuine expression of positive emotions predicted cynicism and reduced professional efficacy. Results highlight the value of distinguishing among emotional valences and regulation types when examining the emotional antecedents of worker stress.

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