Virtual and Face-to-Face Teamwork Differences in Culturally Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Teams

Authors

  • June Takeuchi MA,

    1. University of West Florida
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    • June Takeuchi, MA, is a recent graduate from the University of West Florida with a master's degree in industrial and organizational psychology. She can be reached at junetakeuchi16@gmail.com

  • Steven J. Kass PhD,

    1. University of West Florida
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    • Steven J. Kass, PhD, is a professor of psychology at the University of West Florida where he is the associate director of the School for Psychological and Behavioral Sciences and the coordinator of the Industrial-Organizational Psychology master's program. He can be reached at skass@uwf.edu

  • Sherry K. Schneider PhD,

    1. University of West Florida
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    • Sherry K. Schneider, PhD, is an assistant professor of psychology at the University of West Florida where she is the coordinator of the Women's and Gender Studies and Diversity programs. She can be reached at sschneider@uwf.edu

  • Lisa VanWormer PhD

    1. University of West Florida
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    • Lisa VanWormer, PhD, is an assistant professor of psychology at the University of West Florida where she is the coordinator of the Applied Experimental master's program. She can be reached at lvanwormer@uwf.edu


Abstract

Performance on a decision-making task and cohesion were examined in dyadic (two-person) teams. A total of 118 university students in the United States and Japan participated in the study and were placed in either homogeneous (American–American or Asian–Asian) or heterogeneous (American–Asian) teams, based on whether they were raised in the United States or in an Asian country. Teams worked either face-to-face or via videoconferencing (i.e., virtual teams) and performed a hidden profile task simulating a personnel selection process (i.e., ranking candidates). American–American teams and American–Asian teams outperformed Asian–Asian teams regardless of whether they worked face-to-face or virtually. Team cohesion results mirrored the performance results. The findings suggest that individuals from Asian cultures may require more time to form a cohesive and high-performing team.

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