Rapid Lateglacial tree population dynamics and ecosystem changes in the eastern Baltic region

Authors


  • Heikkilä, M., Fontana, S. L. and Seppä, H. 2009. Rapid Lateglacial tree population dynamics and ecosystem changes in the eastern Baltic region. J. Quaternary Sci., Vol. 24 pp. 802–815. ISSN 0267-8179.

Abstract

A growing body of evidence implies that the concept of 'treeless tundra' in eastern and northern Europe fails to explain the rapidity of Lateglacial and postglacial tree population dynamics of the region, yet the knowledge of the geographic locations and shifting of tree populations is fragmentary. Pollen, stomata and plant macrofossil stratigraphies from Lake Kurjanovas in the poorly studied eastern Baltic region provide improved knowledge of ranges of north-eastern European trees during the Lateglacial and subsequent plant population responses to the abrupt climatic changes of the Lateglacial/Holocene transition. The results prove the Lateglacial presence of tree populations (Betula, Pinus and Picea) in the eastern Baltic region. Particularly relevant is the stomatal and plant macrofossil evidence showing the local presence of reproductive Picea populations during the Younger Dryas stadial at 12 900–11 700 cal. a BP, occurring along with Dryas octopetala and arctic herbs, indicating semi-open vegetation. The spread of PinusBetula forest at ca. 14 400 cal. a BP, the rise of Picea at ca. 12 800 cal. a BP and the re-establishment of PinusBetula forest at ca. 11 700 cal. a BP within a span of centuries further suggest strikingly rapid, climate-driven ecosystem changes rather than gradual plant succession on a newly deglaciated land. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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