Indian summer monsoon during the last two millennia

Authors

  • David M. Anderson,

    Corresponding author
    1. Paleoclimatology Branch of NOAA's National Climatic Data Center, Boulder, Colorado, USA
    • Paleoclimatology Branch of NOAA's National Climatic Data Center, 325 Broadway, E/CC23, Boulder, CO 80305, USA.
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    • The contribution of D. M. Anderson to this article was prepared as part of his official duties as a United States Federal Government employee.

  • Corinne K. Baulcomb,

    1. Paleoclimatology Branch of NOAA's National Climatic Data Center, Boulder, Colorado, USA
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  • Alice K. Duvivier,

    1. Paleoclimatology Branch of NOAA's National Climatic Data Center, Boulder, Colorado, USA
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  • Anil K. Gupta

    1. Department of Geology and Geophysics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, India
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  • Anderson, D. M., Baulcomb, C. K., Duvivier, A. K. and Gupta A. K. 2010. Indian summer monsoon during the last two millennia. J. Quaternary Sci., Vol. 25 pp. 911–917. ISSN 0267-8179.

Abstract

The monsoon is a large-scale feature of the tropical atmospheric circulation, affecting people and economies in the world's most densely populated regions. Future trends due to natural variability and human-induced climate changes are uncertain. Palaeoclimate records can improve our understanding of monsoon dynamics and thereby reduce this uncertainty. Palaeoclimate records have revealed a dramatic decrease in the Asian summer monsoon since the early Holocene maximum 9 ka BP. Here we focus on the last 2 ka, where some records indicate an increasing trend in the summer monsoon. Analysing Globigerina bulloides upwelling records from the Arabian Sea, we find the weakest monsoon occurred 1500 a BP, with an increasing trend towards the present. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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