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The last deglacial history of Lützow-Holm Bay, East Antarctica

Authors

  • Masako Yamane,

    1. Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanaho, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8564, Japan
    2. Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Yusuke Yokoyama,

    Corresponding author
    1. Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanaho, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8564, Japan
    2. Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
    3. Institute of Biogeosciences, Japan Agency of Marine Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), Kanagawa, Japan
    • Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanaho, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8564, Japan.
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  • Hideki Miura,

    1. National Institute of Polar Research, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Hideaki Maemoku,

    1. Program in Science, Technology and Social Studies Education, Graduate School of Education. Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima, Japan
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  • Shogo Iwasaki,

    1. Management Section for Intellectual Property, Kitami Institute of Technology, Kitami, Hokkaido, Japan
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  • Hiroyuki Matsuzaki

    1. Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
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Abstract

Past fluctuations of the Antarctic ice sheet are poorly understood because of a lack of datable materials, radiocarbon reservoir ages and severe environments. Direct evidence of the timing of ice retreat is important in order to understand the Antarctic contribution to global sea-level rise since the Last Glacial Maximum. Here we report the first exposure ages constraining the timing of the last deglaciation from Lützow-Holm Bay, East Antarctica. Our data suggest that the final retreat of the ice sheet in the region occurred rapidly in the early Holocene and the reduction of the ice thickness in the region was at least 350 m. This occurred after the major Northern Hemisphere deglaciation. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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