Centennial-scale winter monsoon variability in the northern East China Sea during the Holocene

Authors

  • Takahiro Nakanishi,

    1. Faculty of Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido University. Kita-10, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810, Japan
    Current affiliation:
    1. Nittoc Construction Co. Ltd, Tokyo, Japan.
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  • Masanobu Yamamoto,

    Corresponding author
    1. Faculty of Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido University. Kita-10, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810, Japan
    • Faculty of Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido University. Kita-10, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810, Japan.
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  • Ryuji Tada,

    1. Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Hirokuni Oda

    1. Institute of Geology and Geoinformation, Geological Survey of Japan, AIST, Tsukuba, Japan
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Abstract

The East China Sea (ECS) responds to changes in the strength of the Kuroshio and East Asian monsoon activity. Multidecadal resolution records of the palaeotemperature indices equation image and equation image from core KY07-04 PC-1 show that the hydrology of the ECS responded to variability in the East Asian winter monsoon. Unlike Mg/Ca-derived sea surface temperatures, which show neither warming nor cooling trends during the Holocene, the equation image record showed a general warming trend at a rate of 0.2°C ka−1. This warming was attributable to shrinkage of the Yellow Sea Central Cold Water and/or weaker winter cooling of the surface water. The equation image record indicated a centennial-scale variability with an ∼1°C amplitude superimposed on the warming trend that reflected changes in the East Asian winter monsoon and/or the Kuroshio. Temperature minima appeared at ca. 3.0, 4.7, 6.2, 7.9 and 9.0 ka, and spectral analysis of the last 7 ka revealed significant peaks with periodicities of approximately 210, 250, and 440 years that were close to those observed in solar radiation. The reconstructed winter monsoon variability is consistent with Chinese documentary records for the last two millennia. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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