Tephrochronology and the late Holocene volcanic and flood history of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland

Authors

  • ANDREW J. DUGMORE,

    Corresponding author
    1. Human Ecodynamics Research Center & Doctoral Program in Anthropology, The Graduate Center, City University of New York, NY, USA
    • Institute of Geography and the Lived Environment, School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9XP, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • ANTHONY J. NEWTON,

    1. Institute of Geography and the Lived Environment, School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9XP, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • KATE T. SMITH,

    1. Geography, College of Life and Environmental Science, University of Exeter, Cornwall Campus, Penryn, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • KERRY-ANN MAIRS

    1. Institute of Geography and the Lived Environment, School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9XP, UK
    Search for more papers by this author

A. J. Dugmore, as above.

ABSTRACT

The hugely disruptive Eyjafjallajökull eruptions of 2010 AD are well known, but the recent history of the volcano is not, which compromises both Icelandic and international hazard assessments and risk planning. This paper identifies and dates the floods caused by two flank eruptions (the c. 920 AD eruption of the Skerin ridge and 6–7th century AD activity around Miðtungugil) and clarifies understanding of c. 6th century AD central vent eruption. These specific contributions to volcanic history are used to illustrate applications of tephrochronology with widespread relevance: how to date eruptions that generate little tephra, better understand the flood hazards presented by glaciated, mountainous volcanoes and the relationship between long-term patterns of activity in neighbouring volcanoes, in this case Eyjafjallajökull and its close (and much larger) neighbour, the volcano Katla. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Ancillary