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Tip-heating-assisted Raman spectroscopy at elevated temperatures

Authors

  • Alvarado Tarun,

    1. Nanophotonics Laboratory, RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan
    2. Near-field Nanophotonics Research Team, RIKEN, 2-1, Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan
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  • Norihiko Hayazawa,

    Corresponding author
    1. Nanophotonics Laboratory, RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan
    2. Near-field Nanophotonics Research Team, RIKEN, 2-1, Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan
    3. CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012, Japan
    • Nanophotonics Laboratory, RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan.
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  • Taka-Aki Yano,

    1. CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012, Japan
    2. Department of Precision Science and Technology and Applied Physics, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan
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  • Satoshi Kawata

    1. Nanophotonics Laboratory, RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan
    2. Near-field Nanophotonics Research Team, RIKEN, 2-1, Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan
    3. CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012, Japan
    4. Department of Precision Science and Technology and Applied Physics, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan
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Abstract

We demonstrate tip-heating-assisted enhanced Raman spectroscopy to investigate the temperature dependence of the carbon nanotube G-band with nanoscale resolution. The controllable and nanoscale heat generated at the tip apex was used to thermally perturb and characterize a small volume in a carbon nanotube sample that is precisely positioned underneath the tip. The dependence of tip enhancement with temperature was also experimentally examined, which is in good agreement with the enhancement calculated from the electromagnetic model of isolated spheroids. The technique presented may open up opportunities in the study of controlled heat-assisted biochemical reactions and physical transformations of nanostructures. It can also be used for thermal characterization of various materials requiring site-selective and controllable nanoscale heat source and could enable the realization of new photothermal devices. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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