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Raman-induced Kerr effect spectroscopy of single-wall carbon nanotubes aqueous suspensions in the range 0.1–10 and 100–250 cm−1

Authors

  • A. F. Bunkin,

    Corresponding author
    1. Wave Research Center, A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia
    • Wave Research Center, Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, Moscow 119991, Russia.
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  • S. M. Pershin

    1. Wave Research Center, A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia
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  • This article is part of the Journal of Raman Spectroscopy special issue entitled “Proceedings of the 9th European Conference on Nonlinear Optical Spectroscopy (ECONOS), Bremen, Germany, June 21–23, 2010” edited by Peter Radi, PSI, Villigen, Switzerland, and Arnulf Materny, Jacobs University, Bremen, Germany.

Abstract

Here, we study a low (less than 0.1 µg/ml) concentration aqueous suspension of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by Raman-induced Kerr effect spectroscopy (RIKES) in the spectral bands 0.1–10 and 100–250 cm−1. This method is capable of carrying out direct investigation of SWNT hydration layers. A comparison of RIKES spectra of SWNT aqueous suspension and that of milli-Q water shows a considerable growth in the intensity of low wavenumber Raman modes. These modes in the 0.1–10 cm−1 range are attributed to the rotational transitions of H2O2 and H2O molecules. We explain the observed intensity increase as due to the production of hydrogen peroxide and the formation of a low-density depletion layer on the water–nanotube interface. A few SWNT radial breathing modes (RBM)are observed (ωRBM = 118.5, 164.7 and 233.5 cm−1) in aqueous suspension, which allows us to estimate the SWNT diameters (∼2.0, 1.5, and 1 nm, respectively). Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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