Journal of Raman Spectroscopy

Cover image for Journal of Raman Spectroscopy

June 2010

Volume 41, Issue 6

Pages 599–716

  1. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Research Articles
    1. Hybrid Rayleigh, Raman and two-photon excited fluorescence spectral confocal microscopy of living cells (pages 599–608)

      Vishnu Vardhan Pully, Aufried Lenferink and Cees Otto

      Article first published online: 12 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/jrs.2501

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      Hybrid confocal microscopy integrates low-wavenumber-resolution Raman imaging, Rayleigh scatter imaging and two-photon fluorescence (TPE) spectral imaging with fast, ‘amplitude-only’ TPE-fluorescence imaging and high-spectral-resolution Raman imaging using a single continuous wave (cw) excitation light source. The cw TPE fluorescence imaging enables rapid selection of the cells of interest followed by Rayleigh and Raman imaging to obtain the chemical information of the molecular distribution.

    2. Disturbing interference patterns in femtosecond stimulated Raman microscopy (pages 609–613)

      E. Ploetz, B. Marx and P. Gilch

      Article first published online: 9 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/jrs.2488

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      Femtosecond stimulated Raman microscopy (FSRM) is an upcoming scanning technique that relies on femtosecond white light pulses and intense picosecond pulses as pump pulses leading to stimulated Raman scattering in the sample. In this article, disturbing interference patterns in FSRM are reported. Their properties and methods to suppress these modulations are presented.

    3. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of hemoglobin on nano silver film prepared by electrolysis method (pages 614–617)

      Yipu Kang, Minzhen Si, Renming Liu and Shibao Qiao

      Article first published online: 6 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/jrs.2489

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      Nano silver film were prepared by the electrolysis method. The SERS spectra of hemoglobin (Hb) on nano silver films were obtained. It is seen from the SERS spectra that the nano silver films can enhance the Raman signal of OxyHb and DeoxyHb efficiently. The electrolysis technique to fabricate this highly bioactive, stable, reusable, and low-cost SERS substrate will be useful in the development of Hb detection methods.

    4. A multi-component optimisation of experimental parameters for maximising SERS enhancements (pages 618–623)

      Nicola R. Yaffe, Andrew Ingram, Duncan Graham and Ewan W. Blanch

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/jrs.2495

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      We present a multi-component optimisation strategy for a range of commonly used Ag colloids as SERS substrates. Concentration-dependant interactions for a wide range of parameters, including colloid and aggregating agent species were considered. We show through the optimisation of experimental conditions the reliability and applicability of SERS can be significantly improved.

    5. Silver nanorods used to promote SERS as a quantitative analytical tool (pages 624–627)

      Geun Hoi Gu and Jung Sang Suh

      Article first published online: 29 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/jrs.2487

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      We have fabricated silver nanorod arrays by electrodepositing the nanorods evenly in the shallow pores of porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates. The SERS intensity increased almost linearly upon malachite green isothiocyanate adsorption on the tips of the silver nanorods as the concentration of the mother solutions was increased. Our results show that silver nanorods fabricated on AAO templates could be used as a SERS substrate for quantitative analyses.

    6. Raman probe to estimate surface energies of embedded semiconductor nanostructures (pages 628–631)

      S. Dhara, P. Magudapathy, K. G. M. Nair and Baldev Raj

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/jrs.2506

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      Embedded semiconductor nanoclusters of GaN, Si and InN were grown using the ion-implantation technique and a subsequent annealing process. The surface energies of the embedded nanoclusters are calculated on the basis of analogy with stressed spherical nanoclusters and excess pressure in a liquid drop, with phonon properties studied for the identification of grown phases as well as estimation of the stress. The estimated surface energies are discussed in the light of possible phase transitions in the nanocrystalline systems.

    7. Raman spectra of benzoic acid enhanced by the silver nanoparticles of various sizes (pages 632–635)

      K. H. Zheng, Y. C. Chou, Y. J. Wu and Y. T. Lee

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/jrs.2484

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      The SERS intensity of benzoic acid's ring-breathing mode at 1003 cm−1 due to chemically reduced Ag nanoparticles of various diameters (8–78 nm) with excitation wavelength of 488 nm are examined. The observed trend fits quite well with those calculated by the Schatz's theoretical model for the spherical silver nanoparticle.

    8. Probing antiaromaticity: resonance Raman investigation of a series of differently substituted boroles (pages 636–641)

      Juliane Köhler, Sonja Lindenmeier, Ingo Fischer, Holger Braunschweig, Thomas Kupfer, Daniela Gamon and Ching-Wen Chiu

      Article first published online: 29 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/jrs.2491

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      The structural changes in boroles upon electronic excitation have been investigated by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy. The study shows that the degree of antiaromaticity in the borole depends on the interaction between the substituent at the boron atom with the empty pz orbital of the boron. A strong boron-iron interaction is evident in the spectra when a ferrocene unit is connected to the borole ring.

    9. Carotenes and carotenoids in natural biological samples: a Raman spectroscopic analysis (pages 642–650)

      Vanessa E. de Oliveira, Harlem V. Castro, Howell G. M. Edwards and Luiz Fernando C. de Oliveira

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/jrs.2493

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      The use of FT-Raman spectroscopy for identification of carotenoids in natural biological systems and the comparison with carotenes standards has to be done with caution. The progressive shift in wavenumber of the ν(C[DOUBLE BOND]C) and ν(C[BOND]C) bands in the conjugated polyene chain with the number of conjugations, and hence the identification of the carotenoid, can be ambiguously interpreted for the range of materials studied here.

    10. Experimental and theoretical studies on corals. I. Toward understanding the origin of color in precious red corals from Raman and IR spectroscopies and DFT calculations (pages 651–658)

      Teobald Kupka, Hong Ming Lin, Leszek Stobiński, Cheng-Han Chen, Wei-Jen Liou, Roman Wrzalik and Zygmunt Flisak

      Article first published online: 9 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/jrs.2502

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      Raman spectra of red coral from Taiwan detect polyene pigments at about 1520 cm−1. This band is modeled using DFT (B3LYP/6-311++G**) for unsubstituted polyenes containing 1-16 double bonds. The presence of only 2-3 polyenes differing slightly in the number of C[DOUBLE BOND]C units as the source of color in pink and red coral is supported by theoretical calculations.

    11. An intelligent background-correction algorithm for highly fluorescent samples in Raman spectroscopy (pages 659–669)

      Zhi-Min Zhang, Shan Chen, Yi-Zeng Liang, Zhao-Xia Liu, Qi-Ming Zhang, Li-Xia Ding, Fei Ye and Hua Zhou

      Article first published online: 9 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/jrs.2500

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      An intelligent background-correction algorithm for highly fluorescent samples in Raman spectroscopy basically consists of peak detection, width estimation by continuous wavelet transform, and background fitting by penalized least squares.

    12. Self-trapped N[BOND]H vibrational states in the polymorphs of glycine, L- and DL-alanine (pages 670–677)

      Boris A. Kolesov and Elena V. Boldyreva

      Article first published online: 19 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/jrs.2490

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      Polarized single-crystal Raman spectra of L- and DL-alanine, α-, β- and γ-polymorphs of glycine show the presence of self-trapped N[BOND]H···O vibrational states localized along ‘zwitterionic’ hydrogen bond (i.e. in the head-to-tail chains of amino acid zwitterions). Energy and temperature dependence of the Raman intensity of the self-trapped bands suggest the coupling of the N[BOND]H vibrational exciton with zero-point quantum motions of the lattice. A large binding energy of the self-trapped states (∼520 cm−1) results from unusual dynamic properties of the zwitterionic bond.

    13. In situ Raman and optical microscopy of the relaxation behavior of amorphous ices under pressure (pages 678–683)

      Yukihiro Yoshimura, Ho-kwang Mao and Russell J. Hemley

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/jrs.2499

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      The transformation of low-density amorphous (LDA) ice produced from high-density amorphous ice (HDA) was studied up to 400 MPa as a function of temperature by in situ Raman spectroscopy and optical microscopy (path 5). The spectra show significant changes occurring above ∼125 K. The results are compared with data reported for the relaxation behavior of HDA (path 3′) which forms what we call relaxed HDA (rHDA) or expanded HDA (eHDA). We find a close connection with eHDA. The results also show new information on the stability limit of LDA ice.

    14. Quantitative mineral analysis using Raman spectroscopy and chemometric techniques (pages 684–689)

      Thomas Dörfer, Wilm Schumacher, Nicolae Tarcea, Michael Schmitt and Jürgen Popp

      Article first published online: 13 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/jrs.2503

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      Here, several techniques for quantitative mineral analysis using Raman spectroscopy are discussed. With the help of chemometrics, the distribution of minerals over a scan area is obtained. The discussed methods are the k-mean cluster analysis, mapping and identification schema, integrating over a band technique, and a procedure for a calibration series to obtain the composition of one spectrum. The preparation of the sample for the investigated approaches is minimal, so the discussed methods can be used for analytical problems.

    15. Raman microscopy of haidingerite Ca(AsO3OH)·H2O and brassite Mg(AsO3OH)·4H2O (pages 690–693)

      Ray L. Frost, Silmarilly Bahfenne, Jiří Čejka, Jiří Sejkora, Sara J. Palmer and Radek Škoda

      Article first published online: 6 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/jrs.2498

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      Raman spectroscopy has been used to study the arsenate minerals haidingerite Ca(AsO3OH)·H2O and brassite Mg(AsO3OH)·4H2O. Broad Raman bands observed at 2842 cm−1 for haidingerite and 3035 cm−1 for brassite indicate strong hydrogen bonding of water molecules in the structure of these minerals. OH···O hydrogen-bond lengths were calculated from the Raman spectra based on empirical relations.

    16. Raman investigations of rare-earth arsenate single crystals (pages 694–697)

      G. Barros, C. C. Santos, A. P. Ayala, I. Guedes, L. A. Boatner and C.-K. Loong

      Article first published online: 6 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/jrs.2497

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      In the present work, we have investigated the characteristics of the polarized Raman spectra for the zircon-type REAsO4 compounds, and have analyzed the variation of the mode wavenumber with varying rare-earth atomic number across the corresponding REAsO4 series.

    17. Crystal structure and phonon modes of ilmenite-type NaBiO3 investigated by Raman and infrared spectroscopies (pages 698–701)

      Anderson Dias and Roberto L. Moreira

      Article first published online: 6 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/jrs.2496

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      Raman analysis of ilmenite-type NaBiO3. The spectrum shows nine Raman-active bands, in excellent agreement with a proposed trigonal R3 structure.

    18. Vibrational spectroscopic study of Sr2ZnTeO6 double perovskites (pages 702–706)

      Anderson Dias, Ganesanpotti Subodh, Mailadil T. Sebastian and Roberto L. Moreira

      Article first published online: 13 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/jrs.2494

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      Raman analysis of Sr2ZnTeO6 double perovskites was carried out. The spectrum shows 12 Raman active bands, in excellent agreement with a proposed tetragonal I4/m space group.

    19. Spectroscopic investigations and computational study of 2-[acetyl(4-bromophenyl)carbamoyl]-4-chlorophenyl acetate (pages 707–716)

      C. Yohannan Panicker, Hema Tresa Varghese, K. C. Mariamma, Koshy John, Samuel Mathew, Jarmila Vinsova, Christian Van Alsenoy and Y. Sheena Mary

      Article first published online: 6 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/jrs.2492

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      FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra of 2-[acetyl(4-bromophenyl) carbamoyl]-4-chlorophenyl acetate were recorded and analyzed. The vibrational wavenumbers of the title compound have been computed using the Gaussian03 software at different levels and compared with the experimental data. The simultaneous IR and Raman activations of the C[DOUBLE BOND]O stretching mode in the carbamoyl moiety show a charge transfer interaction through a π-conjugated path. The assignments of the normal modes are done by potential energy distribution (PED) calculations.

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