SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

Research Synthesis Methods 4(1)

The institutional affiliation for Peter Tugwell and the Acknowledgement/Funding Section appears incomplete in some of the articles in this Special Issue. The complete and correct information are shown here.

An introduction to methodological issues when including non-randomized studies in systematic reviews on the effects of interventions

Barnaby C. Reeves,a* Julian P. T. Higgins,b,c Craig Ramsay,d Beverley Shea,e Peter Tugwellf,g and George A. Wellsg,h

Research Synthesis Methods 4(1): 1–11

Acknowledgements:

We are grateful to the following:

  • All of the workshop participants (Appendix A), all of whom contributed to the discussions that provided the foundation for this paper.
  • Sir Iain Chalmers, for insights about the potential benefits and harms of publishing a systematic review.
  • Members of the Cochrane Non-Randomized Studies Methods Group, whose experiences of conducting or reviewing NRS have informed the group's guidance.

The workshop was supported financially by the Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research (AHRQ; through the Ottawa Collaborating Agency of the ARHQ) and by a grant from the Cochrane Collaboration Discretionary Fund. BCR is supported in part by the UK National Institute for Health Research Bristol Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit. JPTH is supported by MRC Grant U105285807. The Health Services Research Unit is funded by the Scottish Government Executive Health Department. The views expressed in this article are those of the authors, who are responsible for their content and do not represent the views of AHRQ, the Cochrane Collaboration or its registered entities, committees or working groups, the Campbell Collaboration, or the National Institute for Health Research. No statement in this report should be construed as an official position of AHRQ or of the US Department of Health and Human Services.

———

aClinical Trials and Evaluation Unit, School of Clinical Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK

bMRC Biostatistics Unit, Cambridge, UK

cCentre for Reviews and Dissemination, University of York, York, UK

dHealth Services Research Unit, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK

eCommunity Information and Epidemiological Technologies, Institute of Population Health, Ottawa, ON, Canada

fCentre for Global Health, Institute of Population Health, Ottawa, ON, Canada

gDepartment of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada

hDepartment of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada

*Correspondence to: Barnaby C. Reeves, Clinical Trials and Evaluation Unit, University of Bristol, Level 7 Queen's Building, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol BS2 8HW, UK.

E-mail: barney.reeves@bristol.ac.uk

————

Issues relating to study design and risk of bias when including non-randomized studies in systematic reviews on the effects of interventions

Julian P. T. Higgins,a,b* Craig Ramsay,c Barnaby C. Reeves,d Jonathan J. Deeks,e Beverley Shea,f Jeffrey C. Valentine,g Peter Tugwellh,i and George Wellsh,j

Research Synthesis Methods 4(1): 12–25

Acknowledgements:

We are grateful to all the workshop participants (see the Appendix to Paper 1); all of whom contributed to the discussions that provided the foundation for this paper. The workshop was supported financially by the Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research (AHRQ; through the Ottawa Collaborating Agency of the ARHQ) and by a grant from the Cochrane Collaboration Discretionary Fund. JPTH is supported by the Medical Research Council (Unit Programme number U105285807). The Health Services Research Unit is funded by the Scottish Government Executive Health Department. BCR is supported in part by the UK National Institute for Health Research Bristol Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit. The views expressed in this article are those of the authors, who are responsible for their content and do not represent the views of AHRQ, the Cochrane Collaboration or its registered entities, committees or working groups, the Campbell Collaboration, or the National Institute for Health Research. No statement in this report should be construed as an official position of AHRQ or of the US Department of Health and Human Services.

———

aMRC Biostatistics Unit, Cambridge, UK

bCentre for Reviews and Dissemination, University of York, York, UK

cHealth Services Research Unit, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK

dBristol Heart Institute, University of Bristol, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol, UK

ePublic Health, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK

fCommunity Information and Epidemiological Technologies, Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada

gCollege of Education and Human Development, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA

hDepartment of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada

iCentre for Global Health, Institute of Population Health, Ottawa, ON, Canada

jDepartment of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada

*Correspondence to: Julian Higgins, MRC Biostatistics Unit, Institute of Public Health, Robinson Way, Cambridge, CB2 0SR, UK.

E-mail: julian.higgins@mrc-bsu.cam.ac.uk

————

Issues relating to selective reporting when including non-randomized studies in systematic reviews on the effects of healthcare interventions

Susan L. Norris,a* David Moher,b Barnaby C. Reeves,c Beverley Shea,d Yoon Loke,e Sarah Garner,f Laurie Anderson,g Peter Tugwellh,i and George Wellsi,j

Research Synthesis Methods 4(1): 36–47

Acknowledgements:

The workshop was supported by the Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research (AHRQ; through the Ottawa Collaborating Agency of the ARHQ) and by a grant from the Cochrane Collaboration Discretionary Fund. BCR is supported in part by the UK National Institute for Health Research Bristol Biomedical Research Unit in Cardiovascular Medicine. DM is supported by the University of Ottawa Research Chair. The views expressed in this article are those of the authors, who are responsible for their content and do not represent the views of AHRQ, the Cochrane Collaboration or its registered entities, committees or working groups, the Campbell Collaboration, or the National Institute for Health Research. No statement in this report should be construed as an official position of AHRQ or of the US Department of Health and Human Services. Participants at the workshop contributed to discussions of this paper.

———

aDepartment of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA

bOttawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada

cBristol Heart Institute, Bristol Royal Infirmary, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK

dCommunity Information and Epidemiological Technologies, Institute of Population Health, Ottawa, ON, Canada

eFaculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK

fNational Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, London, UK

gSchool of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA

hCentre for Global Health, Institute of Population Health, Ottawa, ON, Canada

iDepartment of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada

jDepartment of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, ON, Canada

*Correspondence to: Susan L. Norris, Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology, Oregon Health & Science University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Mail Stop: BICC Portland, OR 97239, USA.

E-mail: norriss@ohsu.edu

————

Non-randomized studies as a source of complementary, sequential or replacement evidence for randomized controlled trials in systematic reviews on the effects of interventions

Holger J. Schünemann,a,b,*,† Peter Tugwell,c,d,e Barnaby C. Reeves,f Elie A. Akl,a,g Nancy Santesso,a Frederick A. Spencer,b Beverley Shea,c George Wellsd,i and Mark Helfandh

Research Synthesis Methods 4(1): 49–62

Acknowledgements:

We are grateful to the workshop participants, all of whom contributed to the discussions that provided the foundation for this paper. The views expressed in this article are those of the authors, who are responsible for their content and do not represent the views of AHRQ, the Cochrane Collaboration or its registered entities, committees or working groups, the Campbell Collaboration, or the National Institute for Health Research. No statement in this report should be construed as an official position of AHRQ or of the US Department of Health and Human Services.

———

aDepartment of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada

bDepartment of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada

cClinical Epidemiology Unit, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, Canada

dDepartment of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada

eCentre for Global Health, Institute of Population Health, Ottawa, ON, Canada

fBristol Heart Institute, University of Bristol, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol, UK

gDepartment of Internal Medicine, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon

hPortland VA Medical Center and Department of Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA

iDepartment of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, ON, Canada

*Correspondence to: Holger J. Schünemann, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University Health Sciences Centre, Room 2C10B, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada.

E-mail: schuneh@mcmaster.ca

————

Checklists of methodological issues for review authors to consider when including non-randomized studies in systematic reviews

George A. Wells,a,b,*,† Beverley Shea,c Julian P. T. Higgins,d,e Jonathan Sterne,f Peter Tugwellb,g and Barnaby C. Reevesh

Research Synthesis Methods 4(1): 63–77

Funding:

The workshop was supported financially by the Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research (AHRQ; through the Ottawa Collaborating Agency of the ARHQ) and by a grant from the Cochrane Collaboration Discretionary Fund. BCR is supported in part by the UK National Institute for Health Research Bristol Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit. JPTH was supported by MRC Grant U105285807. The Health Services Research Unit is funded by the Scottish Government Executive Health Department. The views expressed in this article are those of the authors, who are responsible for their content and do not represent the views of AHRQ, the Cochrane Collaboration or its registered entities, committees or working groups, the Campbell Collaboration, or the National Institute for Health Research. No statement in this report should be construed as an official position of AHRQ or of the US Department of Health and Human Services.

———

aDepartment of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada

bDepartment of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada

cCommunity Information and Epidemiological Technologies, Institute of Population Health, Ottawa, ON, Canada

dMRC Biostatistics Unit, Cambridge, UK

eCentre for Reviews and Dissemination, University of York, York, UK

fSchool of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK

gCentre for Global Health, Institute of Population Health, Ottawa, ON, Canada

hClinical Trials and Evaluation Unit, School of Clinical Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK

*Correspondence to: George Wells, Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON K1H 8M5, Canada.

E-mail: gawells@ottawaheart.ca