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Possible nutritional and health-related value promotion in orange juice preserved by high-pressure treatment

Authors

  • Begoña de Ancos,

    1. Plant Foods Science and Technology Department, Instituto del Frío, CSIC, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid, Spain
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  • Sonia Sgroppo,

    1. Plant Foods Science and Technology Department, Instituto del Frío, CSIC, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid, Spain
    Current affiliation:
    1. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Naturales y Agrimensura, Dept de Bromatología, Avda Libertad 5450, 3400 Corrientes, Argentina
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  • Lucía Plaza,

    1. Plant Foods Science and Technology Department, Instituto del Frío, CSIC, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid, Spain
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  • M Pilar Cano

    Corresponding author
    1. Plant Foods Science and Technology Department, Instituto del Frío, CSIC, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid, Spain
    • Plant Foods Science and Technology Department, Instituto del Frío, CSIC, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid, Spain
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  • This paper was presented at the International Conference on the Nutritional Enhancement of Plant Foods in European Trade, held at the John Innes Centre, Norwich, UK in September 2000. The majority of the conference proceedings were published in a special issue of the journal (J Sci Food Agric81(9) (July 2000)). The position statements from the European Union Concerted Action ‘The Nutritional Enhancement of Plant Foods in European Trade (NeoDiet)’ FAIR CT-97-3052 were published in a special issue of the journal (J Sci Food Agric80(7) (15 May 2000))

Abstract

Effects of high-pressure treatment on the orange juice carotenoids (β-carotene, α-carotene, zeaxanthin, lutein and β-cryptoxanthin) associated with nutritional (vitamin A) and health-related (radical-scavenging capacity) values were investigated. Various high-pressure treatments (50–350 MPa) combined with different temperatures (30 and 60 °C) and times (2.5, 5 and 15 min) of treatment were assayed. The carotenoid content of the orange juice was analysed by HPLC-UV, the vitamin A value was determined as retinol equivalents (RE) and the free radical-scavenging capacity was evaluated using the DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1,1-picrylhydrazyl) radical model system. A storage study was carried out at refrigeration temperature (4 °C). High-pressure treatments at 350 MPa produced significant increases of 20–43% in the carotenoid content of fresh orange juice (from 3.99 to 4.78–5.70 mg l−1). A non-uniform behaviour of high-pressure treatments was detected. An increase in time (beyond 5 min) or temperature (above 30 °C) of treatment did not improve the amount of carotenoids extracted. Owing to better extraction of carotenoids, an increase in vitamin A value from 164 to 238 RE l−1 (45%) was achieved with the 350 MPa/30 °C/5 min treatment. No correlation was found between the increase in carotenoid amount extracted and the free radical-scavenging activity.

© 2002 Society of Chemical Industry

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