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Micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography of methylxanthines-containing beverages: discussion of the molecular species involved

Authors

  • Alicia B Pomilio,

    Corresponding author
    1. PROPLAME-CONICET, Departamento de Química Orgánica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pabellón 2, Ciudad Universitaria, C1428EHA Buenos Aires, Argentina
    • PROPLAME-CONICET, Departamento de Química Orgánica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pabellón 2, Ciudad Universitaria, C1428EHA Buenos Aires, Argentina
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    • Research Members of the National Research Council of Argentina (CONICET).

  • Silvia P Trajtemberg,

    1. PROPLAME-CONICET, Departamento de Química Orgánica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pabellón 2, Ciudad Universitaria, C1428EHA Buenos Aires, Argentina
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  • Arturo A Vitale

    1. PROPLAME-CONICET, Departamento de Química Orgánica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pabellón 2, Ciudad Universitaria, C1428EHA Buenos Aires, Argentina
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    • Research Members of the National Research Council of Argentina (CONICET).


Abstract

Micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC) experimental conditions were applied to 12 samples of methylxanthine-containing infusions of different commercial brands of yerba mate, coffee, tea and cocoa as well as two cola drinks. The best resolution in this mode of automated high-performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE) was achieved here when using 15 kV voltage in an uncoated fused-silica capillary of 45 cm length (40 cm effective length), 50 mM sodium dodecylsulfate, 90 mM pH 8.5 borate buffer and UV detection. Theobromine, caffeine and theophylline were separated, and the peak splitting due to tautomeric species was observed. Experimental conditions were controlled, keeping constant the size of the elution window in each analysis. The limit of detection was less than 1 mg l−1, the limit of quantitation was 2.5 mg l−1 and the work range was 2.5–300 mg l−1. This HPCE–MECC system has proved suitable for the analysis/quality control of xanthines in beverages for consumption. Roles of various parameters as well as distinctly charged species of each xanthine and the origin of peak splitting in this MECC system are discussed. Copyright © 2004 Society of Chemical Industry

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