Nutritive value of the larvae of raphia palm beetle (Oryctes rhinoceros) and weevil (Rhyncophorus pheonicis)

Authors

  • Eugene N Onyeike,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biochemistry, Nutrition and Toxicology Unit, Faculty of Science, University of Port Harcourt, PMB 5323, Port Harcourt, Nigeria
    • Department of Biochemistry, Nutrition and Toxicology Unit, Faculty of Science, University of Port Harcourt, PMB 5323, Port Harcourt, Nigeria
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  • Edward O Ayalogu,

    1. Department of Biochemistry, Nutrition and Toxicology Unit, Faculty of Science, University of Port Harcourt, PMB 5323, Port Harcourt, Nigeria
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  • Catherine C Okaraonye

    1. Department of Biochemistry, Nutrition and Toxicology Unit, Faculty of Science, University of Port Harcourt, PMB 5323, Port Harcourt, Nigeria
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Abstract

The proximate nutrient composition, energy value, mineral concentrations, amino acid composition and chemical score of the larvae of raphia palm beetle (Oryctes rhinoceros) and weevil (Rhyncophorus pheonicis) were evaluated. Values of moisture, ash and crude protein were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in O rhinoceros than in R pheonicis while the reverse was the case for the values of crude fat, total carbohydrate and energy content. The crude protein content of both samples was high, with a value of 42.3 ± 0.84% for the palm beetle and 31.6 ± 0.59% for palm weevil, while crude fat was high (17.3 ± 1.2%) in palm weevil and very low (0.55 ± 0.10%) in palm beetle. The calorific value in kcal 100 g−1 sample was 425 in R pheonicis and was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than the value of 285 in O rhinoceros, due to a relatively higher crude fat and total carbohydrate in the former compared with the latter. The mineral concentrations were high and differed for all the elements, with O rhinoceros having the higher level of many of the mineral elements (calcium, magnesium, potassium, manganese, iron and phosphorus) compared with R pheonicis, consistent with a significantly higher (p < 0.05) ash content of 12.7 ± 0.81% in O rhinoceros against the value of 4.2 ± 0.45% ash in R pheonicis. The amino acid profile showed both samples to be good sources of essential and non-essential amino acids including cysteine and methionine, both of which contain sulfur. Valine, which had the lowest chemical score of 51.2%, was the most limiting amino acid for protein quality in both O rhinoceros and R pheonicis. Copyright © 2005 Society of Chemical Industry

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