Fruit size and stage of ripeness affect postharvest water loss in bell pepper fruit (Capsicum annuum L.)

Authors

  • Juan C Díaz-Pérez,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Horticulture, Tifton Campus, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA 31793, USA
    • Department of Horticulture, Tifton Campus, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA 31793, USA
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  • María D Muy-Rangel,

    1. Department of Horticulture, Tifton Campus, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA 31793, USA
    Current affiliation:
    1. Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo, Carretera a Culiacán—El Dorado, km. 5.5, PO Box 32-A, Culiacán, Sinaloa 80129, Mexico
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  • Arturo G Mascorro

    1. Department of Horticulture, Tifton Campus, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA 31793, USA
    Current affiliation:
    1. INIFAP, Carretera Torreón—Matamoros Km. 17, PO Box 247, Torreón, Coahuila 27000, Mexico
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Abstract

Quality of bell peppers after harvest is largely influenced by water loss from the fruit. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of fruit fresh weight, size, and stage of ripeness on the rate of water loss and permeance to water vapor. Fruit diameter was correlated with fresh weight, and surface area was associated with fresh weight and diameter. Fruit surface area decreased logarithmically with increases in fruit size, with smaller fruit showing larger changes in surface area than larger fruit. Mean water loss rate for individual fruit and permeance to water vapor declined with increases in fruit size and as fruit ripeness progressed. Fruit surface area/fresh weight ratio and rate of water loss were both highest in immature fruit and showed no differences between mature green and red fruit. In mature fruit, permeance to water vapor for the skin and calyx were 29 µmol m−2 s−1 kPa−1 and 398 µmol m−2 s−1 kPa−1, respectively. About 26% of the water loss in mature fruit occurred through the calyx. There was a decline in firmness, water loss rate, and permeance to water vapor of the fruit with increasing fruit water loss during storage. Copyright © 2006 Society of Chemical Industry

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