Improved ELISA and dot-blot methods for the detection of whey proteins in meat products

Authors

  • Claude Demeulemester,

    1. CTSCCV (Centre Technique de la Salaison, de la Charcuterie et des Conserves de Viandes), 7 avenue du Général de Gaulle, F-94700 Maisons-Alfort, France
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  • Annie Lajon,

    1. CTSCCV (Centre Technique de la Salaison, de la Charcuterie et des Conserves de Viandes), 7 avenue du Général de Gaulle, F-94700 Maisons-Alfort, France
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  • Vincent Abramowski,

    1. CTSCCV (Centre Technique de la Salaison, de la Charcuterie et des Conserves de Viandes), 7 avenue du Général de Gaulle, F-94700 Maisons-Alfort, France
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  • Jean-Luc Martin,

    1. CTSCCV (Centre Technique de la Salaison, de la Charcuterie et des Conserves de Viandes), 7 avenue du Général de Gaulle, F-94700 Maisons-Alfort, France
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  • Paule Durand

    1. CTSCCV (Centre Technique de la Salaison, de la Charcuterie et des Conserves de Viandes), 7 avenue du Général de Gaulle, F-94700 Maisons-Alfort, France
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Abstract

Two techniques, ELISA and dot-blot, were applied to the qualitative detection of very low levels of whey proteins in liver pãtés. The use of an avidin-biotin amplification system for both methods led to a useful improvement of the detection limit. The detection level which was 4 g kg−1 with the classical ELISA method was improved to I g kg−1 with the amplified ELISA method. Using the dot-blot technique, the results showed that the minimum detectable level was 1–7 g kg−1 for the classical method with nitrocellulose (NC), 0–7 g kg−1 for the amplified method with NC, 0–7 g kg−1 for the classical method with cyanogen bromide-activated NC (activated NC) and 0–3 g kg−1 for the amplified method with activated NC.

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