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Physicochemical properties of cassava, potato and jicama starches oxidised with organic acids

Authors

  • Fernando Martínez-Bustos,

    Corresponding author
    1. CINVESTAV-Unidad Querétaro, Libramiento Norponiente No. 2000, Fracc. Real de Juriquilla, Apdo Postal 1-798, CP 76230, Querétaro, Qro, Mexico
    • CINVESTAV-Unidad Querétaro, Libramiento Norponiente No. 2000, Fracc. Real de Juriquilla, Apdo Postal 1-798, CP 76230, Querétaro, Qro, Mexico.
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  • Silvia Lorena Amaya-Llano,

    1. CINVESTAV-Unidad Querétaro, Libramiento Norponiente No. 2000, Fracc. Real de Juriquilla, Apdo Postal 1-798, CP 76230, Querétaro, Qro, Mexico
    2. Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro, Centro Universitario, Cerro de las Campanas, s/n, Qro, Mexico
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  • J Antonio Carbajal-Arteaga,

    1. CINVESTAV-Unidad Querétaro, Libramiento Norponiente No. 2000, Fracc. Real de Juriquilla, Apdo Postal 1-798, CP 76230, Querétaro, Qro, Mexico
    2. Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Av. Dr Manuel Nava 6, Zona Universitaria, San Luis Potosí 78210, Mexico
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  • Yoon Kil Chang,

    1. Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Departamento de Tecnologia de Alimentos, Caixa Postal 6121, CEP 13.083-970, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil
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  • José de J Zazueta-Morales

    1. Universidad A. de Sinaloa, Maestríaen Ciencia y Tecnología de Alimentos, Apdo Postal 1354, Culiacán, Sin., CP 80000, México
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Abstract

The oxidising effects of organic (acetic, citric and lactic) acids on the physicochemical properties of starches from cassava, potato and jicama were investigated. Cassava starch oxidised with lactic and citric acids had the highest carbonyl contents (5.43 and 5.84 g kg−1 respectively), while oxidised potato starch had the highest carboxyl contents. Oxidised jicama starch showed the lowest carbonyl and carboxyl contents. Oxidation increased the maximum viscosity of cassava starch (from 426.61 to 670.11 relative viscosity units (RVU)) and jicama starch (from 160.17 to 561.50 RVU) but decreased that of potato starch (from 669.44 to 206.92 RVU). When carbonyl and carboxyl groups were incorporated into jicama starch granules, the resistance of these granules to stirring at constant temperature (holding) increased, as did their final and retrogradation viscosities. However, the behaviour of oxidised cassava and potato starches, as indicated by a Rapid Visco Analyser, was different. The highest values of endotherm enlargement were found for native and oxidised jicama starch, while the lowest values were found for native and oxidised cassava starch. Native and oxidised potato starch had the highest enthalpy values (14.30–18.30 J g−1), while jicama starch had the lowest (9.50–11.9 J g−1). The high intrinsic viscosity of native potato starch was attributed to B-type starch with a longer-than-average amylopectin chain length and a lower degree of crystallinity. Oxidised granules showed little erosion in the form of grooves; on the contrary, oxidation left the grains with a very smooth surface. Copyright © 2007 Society of Chemical Industry

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