Get access

Rats show differences in some biomarkers of health when eating diets based on ingredients produced with three different cultivation strategies

Authors

  • Charlotte Lauridsen,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Animal Health, Welfare and Nutrition, Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Research Centre Foulum, P.O. Box 50, DK-8830 Tjele, Denmark
    • Department of Animal Health, Welfare and Nutrition, Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Research Centre Foulum, P.O. Box 50, DK-8830 Tjele, Denmark.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Chen Yong,

    1. Department of Animal Health, Welfare and Nutrition, Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Research Centre Foulum, P.O. Box 50, DK-8830 Tjele, Denmark
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ulrich Halekoh,

    1. Department of Genetics and Biotechnology, Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Research Centre Aarslev, P.O. Box 50, DK-5792 Aarslev, Denmark
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Susanne Højbjerg Bügel,

    1. Research Department of Human Nutrition, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Rolighedsvej 30, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Kirsten Brandt,

    1. School of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, Newcastle University, Agriculture Building, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Lars Porskjær Christensen,

    1. Department of Food Science, Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Research Centre Foulum, P.O. Box 50, DK-8830 Tjele, Denmark
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Henry Jørgensen

    1. Department of Animal Health, Welfare and Nutrition, Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Research Centre Foulum, P.O. Box 50, DK-8830 Tjele, Denmark
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to identify health-related biomarkers affected by different growth conditions of plant foods. Rats were fed balanced diets composed of vegetables and rapeseed oil from three different cultivation systems (‘LIminusP’, low fertiliser input, without pesticides; ‘LIplusP’, low fertiliser input, with pesticides; and ‘HIplusP’, high fertiliser input, with pesticides) chosen to cover a broad range of management options, rather than representing actual food production systems.

RESULTS: Rats fed LIminusP and LIplusP had a higher serum IgG concentration compared to rats fed HIplusP and 14% less adipose tissue. Rats fed LIminusP showed less movement during the day than the other treatments, with no differences during the night. The liver metabolic function and free malonedialdehyde concentration differed between the LIminusP and the LIplusP treatments. Despite similar fatty acid composition and vitamin E content of the rapeseed oil used for the LIminusP and HIplusP diets, plasma concentrations of oleic and linoleic acids, γ- and α-tocopherol and the liver concentration of lipid hydroperoxides differed between these two treatments.

CONCLUSION: Differences between dietary treatments composed of ingredients from different cultivation methods caused differences in some health-related biomarkers, which, in future studies on this topic, should be assessed with respect to health implications. Copyright © 2007 Society of Chemical Industry

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary