Use of durum residue flour, a lower value product of durum milling, by incorporation into wheat flour dough without deterioration in baking quality

Authors

  • Dr Mike J Sissons,

    Corresponding author
    1. Tamworth Agricultural Institute, NSW Department of Primary Industries, 4 Marsden Park Road, Calala NSW 2340, Australia
    2. Value Added Wheat CRC Locked Bag 1345, North Ryde, NSW 1670, Australia
    • Tamworth Agricultural Institute, NSW Department of Primary Industries, 4 Marsden Park Road, Calala NSW 2340, Australia
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  • Ian L Batey,

    1. Value Added Wheat CRC Locked Bag 1345, North Ryde, NSW 1670, Australia
    2. CSIRO Plant Industry, Grain Quality Research Laboratory, PO Box 7, North Ryde, NSW 1670, Australia
    Current affiliation:
    1. Food Science Australia, P.O. Box 52, North Ryde, NSW 1670, Australia
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  • Sue Balfe,

    1. Tamworth Agricultural Institute, NSW Department of Primary Industries, 4 Marsden Park Road, Calala NSW 2340, Australia
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  • Ray Hare,

    1. Tamworth Agricultural Institute, NSW Department of Primary Industries, 4 Marsden Park Road, Calala NSW 2340, Australia
    2. Value Added Wheat CRC Locked Bag 1345, North Ryde, NSW 1670, Australia
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  • Finlay MacRitchie

    1. Value Added Wheat CRC Locked Bag 1345, North Ryde, NSW 1670, Australia
    2. CSIRO Plant Industry, Grain Quality Research Laboratory, PO Box 7, North Ryde, NSW 1670, Australia
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Grain Science and Industry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506-2201, USA
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Abstract

BACKGROUND: During the milling of durum wheat to semolina, about 10–15% of total products produced is residue flour, a lower value product than the semolina. This study investigated the potential for using the durum residue flour as an additive in bread-making to improve its potential commercial value.

RESULTS: Incorporation of residue durum flour from 102 breeding lines into a low protein flour and standard bakers' flour at 20% incorporation improved the bake loaf volume with minimal change in Mixograph dough mixing time and peak resistance in many of the lines tested. Loaf yellow b was always increased even with only a 10% incorporation. Baking flours can tolerate 20% incorporation with no deleterious affects on loaf volume and bake score.

CONCLUSION: The results show a potential for using the lower value durum residue flour for baking bread of acceptable quality with a slightly higher yellow colour. This would improve the profitability for the miller and provide alternative ingredients to the baker for preparing specialty breads. Copyright © 2008 Crown in the Right of the State of New South Wales and Society of Chemical Industry

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