Variation in the volatile terpenoids of two industrially important basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) cultivars during plant ontogeny in two different cropping seasons from India

Authors

  • Ram Swaroop Verma,

    Corresponding author
    1. Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants (CSIR-CIMAP), Research Centre, Purara, P.O. Gagrigole, Bageshwar, Uttarakhand 263688, India
    Current affiliation:
    1. Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants (CSIR-CIMAP), Research Centre, Pantnagar, P.O. Dairy Farm Nagla, Udham Singh Nagar, Uttarakhand 263149, India.
    • Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants (CSIR-CIMAP), Research Centre, Purara, P.O. Gagrigole, Bageshwar, Uttarakhand 263688, India.
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  • Rajendra Chandra Padalia,

    1. Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants (CSIR-CIMAP), Research Centre, Pantnagar, P.O. Dairy Farm Nagla, Udham Singh Nagar, Uttarakhand 263149, India
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  • Amit Chauhan

    1. Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants (CSIR-CIMAP), Research Centre, Purara, P.O. Gagrigole, Bageshwar, Uttarakhand 263688, India
    Current affiliation:
    1. Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants (CSIR-CIMAP), Research Centre, Pantnagar, P.O. Dairy Farm Nagla, Udham Singh Nagar, Uttarakhand 263149, India.
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  • Note: The abstract of this paper was published as paper number PPT-07 in the proceedings of the CIMAP Golden Jubilee National Symposium on ‘Future trends in medicinal and aromatic plants—technologies and strategies’ held at CIMAP, Research Centre, Hyderabad, India, on 17 November 2009.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Two Ocimum basilicum cultivars, ‘Vikarsudha’ and ‘CIM-Saumya’, grown in the Kumaon region of western Himalaya were evaluated for their essential oil yield and composition at different stages of plant growth during two distinct cropping seasons (spring–summer and rain–autumn).

RESULTS: The highest yield of essential oil was obtained at full bloom stage in both cultivars in both cropping seasons. The essential oils obtained from different stages in two cropping seasons were analysed by capillary gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection, and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. The major component of cultivar ‘Vikarsudha’ was methyl chavicol (84.3–94.3%), while for cultivar ‘CIM-Saumya’ the main components were methyl chavicol (62.5–77.6%) and linalool (14.4–34.1%).

CONCLUSION: This study clearly indicated that cultivar, cropping season, plant ontogeny and plant part had significant effects on the yield and quality of the essential oil of O. basilicum. Further, the amount of methyl chavicol in the cultivars grown in this region was higher than in cultivars from other parts of India. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry

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