Physiological responses of Indian jujube (Ziziphus mauritiana Lamk.) fruit to storage temperature under modified atmosphere packaging

Authors

  • Laxman Jat,

    1. Postharvest Technology Laboratory, Department of Horticulture, Rajasthan College of Agriculture, Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture and Technology, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India
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  • Sunil Pareek,

    Corresponding author
    • Postharvest Technology Laboratory, Department of Horticulture, Rajasthan College of Agriculture, Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture and Technology, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India
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  • Kunj B Shukla

    1. Department of Plant Physiology, Rajasthan College of Agriculture, Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture and Technology, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India
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Correspondnce to: Sunil Pareek, Postharvest Technology Laboratory, Department of Horticulture, Rajasthan College of Agriculture, Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture and Technology, Udaipur, Rajasthan 313 001, India. E-mail: sunil_ciah@yahoo.co.in

Abstract

Background

The effect of storage temperature on physiological responses in Indian jujube (Ziziphus mauritiana Lamk. cv. Gola) fruit was investigated. Freshly harvested fruits at physiological maturity characterised by colour-turning stage were stored at ambient temperature, 12 and 6 °C for 21, 35 and 35 days respectively. Headspace O2, CO2 and C2H4, moisture content, respiration, ethylene production, firmness, tristimulus colour, chroma, hue angle and chilling injury index were monitored during fruit storage.

RESULTS

Rates of respiration and ethylene production increased after 1 week of storage at ambient temperature, while peaks were observed after 2 weeks at 12 and 6 °C. Headspace O2 decreased continuously during storage, while CO2 and C2H4 increased at all storage temperatures. Moisture content and firmness also decreased during storage. Hunter L* values increased during storage, which correlated with the darkening of fruit colour. Fruit stored at ambient temperature did not show any chilling injury symptoms, while chilling injury appeared on day 28 under 12 °C storage and on day 21 under 6 °C storage.

CONCLUSION

Indian jujube fruit showed high rates of respiration and ethylene production that were significantly affected by different storage temperatures. Lower temperatures increased the shelf life of the fruit, but chilling injury was a problem under 6 °C storage. Indian jujube fruit could be stored at 6 °C for up to 35 days if chilling injury could be alleviated. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry

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