Effect of alternative postharvest control treatments on the storability of ‘Golden Delicious’ apples

Authors

  • Roberto Moscetti,

    1. Department of Science and Technology for Agriculture, Forest, Nature and Energy, Tuscia University, Viterbo, Italy
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  • Letizia Carletti,

    1. Department of Science and Technology for Agriculture, Forest, Nature and Energy, Tuscia University, Viterbo, Italy
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  • Danilo Monarca,

    1. Department of Science and Technology for Agriculture, Forest, Nature and Energy, Tuscia University, Viterbo, Italy
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  • Massimo Cecchini,

    1. Department of Science and Technology for Agriculture, Forest, Nature and Energy, Tuscia University, Viterbo, Italy
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  • Elisabetta Stella,

    1. Department of Science and Technology for Agriculture, Forest, Nature and Energy, Tuscia University, Viterbo, Italy
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  • Riccardo Massantini

    Corresponding author
    1. Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest system, Tuscia University, Viterbo, Italy
    • Department of Science and Technology for Agriculture, Forest, Nature and Energy, Tuscia University, Viterbo, Italy
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Correspondence to: Riccardo Massantini, Tuscia University, Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest system, S. Camillo De Lellis snc, 01100 Viterbo, Italy. E-mail: massanti@unitus.it

Abstract

Background

Apples are subject to a high degree of fungal diseases, but the use of synthetic fungicides has been questioned because of public safety concerns, social rejection, and the development of resistance in pathogens. Thus, development of new postharvest treatments against apple fungal pathogens is necessary. Most studies have reported their effectiveness, but not all report the effects on the quality and storability of the fruit. In this study, the effects of physical (hot water), chemical (quercetin) and biological (yeast antagonist) microfungal control on the quality of ‘Golden Delicious’ apple during storage at 2 ± 0.5 °C, and 90 ± 2% of relative humidity, for 2 months were investigated and compared.

Results

Heat-treated apples exhibited peel fruit damage (surface browning and internal breakdown disorders) and promoted ripening in the fruit. The quercetin caustic spray caused the development of peel chemical burn in all treated fruit. Both yeast antagonist and quercetin treatments did not affect the apple ripening process but stimulated an increase in ethylene production and in respiratory activity.

Conclusion

The data indicated that the effects on quality and storability were dependent on the method of treatment used, and antagonistic yeast was the best microfungal control because of it did not cause any disorders or negative effects on apple quality during storage. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry

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