Hot air treatment-induced arginine catabolism is associated with elevated polyamines and proline levels and alleviates chilling injury in postharvest tomato fruit

Authors

  • Xinhua Zhang,

    1. School of Agricultural and Food Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, Shandong, People's Republic of China
    2. College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing, People's Republic of China
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  • Lin Shen,

    1. College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing, People's Republic of China
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  • Fujun Li,

    Corresponding author
    • School of Agricultural and Food Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, Shandong, People's Republic of China
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  • Demei Meng,

    1. College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing, People's Republic of China
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  • Jiping Sheng

    Corresponding author
    1. College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing, People's Republic of China
    2. School of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development, Renmin University of China, Beijing, People's Republic of China
    • School of Agricultural and Food Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, Shandong, People's Republic of China
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Correspondence to: Fujun Li, School of Agricultural and Food Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo 255049, Shandong, People's Republic of China. E-mail: lifujun@sdut.edu.cn Jiping Sheng, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, People's Republic of ChinaE-mail: pingshen@cau.edu.cn

Abstract

BACKGROUND

To understand whether arginine catabolism might be involved in hot air (HA)-induced chilling tolerance mechanism in tomato fruit, we investigated the effect of HA treatment on endogenous arginine catabolism in relation to chilling injury.

RESULTS

Tomato fruit were harvested at mature green stage and treated with HA at 38°C for 12 h and then stored at 2°C for 21 days. The effects of HA treatment on fruit chilling injury and gene expression levels or enzyme activity, and metabolites related to arginine catabolism were evaluated. HA treatment reduced the chilling injury symptoms of tomato fruit and enhanced the accumulation of endogenous polyamines, especially putrescine and proline. This accumulation is associated with the increased transcript levels of genes encoding arginase (LeARG1 and LeARG2), arginine decarboxylase (LeADC), ornithine decarboxylase (LeODC) and ornithine aminotransferase (LeOAT) at most sampling times. However, HA treatment had little effect on nitric oxide synthase activity and nitric oxide concentration.

CONCLUSION

These results revealed that the reduction in chilling injury by HA treatment may be due to the accumulation of putrescine and proline induced primarily by activating the catabolism of endogenous arginine. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry

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