Counteraction of oxidative damage by pomegranate juice: influence of the cultivar

Authors

  • Mattia Di Nunzio,

    1. Interdepartmental Centre for Industrial Agri-Food Research, University of Bologna, Cesena (FC), Italy
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  • Moreno Toselli,

    1. Interdepartmental Centre for Industrial Agri-Food Research, University of Bologna, Cesena (FC), Italy
    2. Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
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  • Vito Verardo,

    1. Interdepartmental Centre for Industrial Agri-Food Research, University of Bologna, Cesena (FC), Italy
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  • Maria F Caboni,

    1. Interdepartmental Centre for Industrial Agri-Food Research, University of Bologna, Cesena (FC), Italy
    2. Department of Agri-Food Sciences and Technologies, University of Bologna, Cesena (FC), Italy
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  • Alessandra Bordoni

    Corresponding author
    1. Interdepartmental Centre for Industrial Agri-Food Research, University of Bologna, Cesena (FC), Italy
    2. Department of Agri-Food Sciences and Technologies, University of Bologna, Cesena (FC), Italy
    • Correspondence to: Alessandra Bordoni, Department of Agri-Food Sciences and Technologies, University of Bologna, piazza Goidanich, 60–47521 Cesena (FC) 47521, Italy. E-mail: alessandra.bordoni@unibo.it

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Abstract

BACKGROUND

Pomegranate (Punica granatum) has gained widespread popularity as a potential functional food due to its high phenolics content. Although in different studies pomegranate juice has been shown to exert anti-atherogenic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects, the cultivar-related differences in phenolics content and antioxidant activity must be carefully taken into account when evaluating the health effects. The first aim of this study was to rank the juices of 15 different varieties of pomegranate according to their total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity. Then three juices were selected, better characterised and added to HepG2 cells as a supplement to evaluate the protective effect against induced oxidative stress.

RESULTS

The cultivars Wonderful, Hicaz and G2 were chosen according to the ranking and the corresponding juices used at two different concentrations as a supplement to HepG2 cells. Overall, all juices were able to protect cells from oxidative damage, but differences that could be related to the different phenolics content and pattern were detected among the three juices.

CONCLUSION

Our results show the advantage of screening cultivars prior to efficacy studies. This approach can be useful for food companies that focus on the development of food that has added nutritional and health value. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry

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