Get access

Identification of lactic acid bacteria in salted Chinese cabbage by SDS-PAGE and PCR-DGGE

Authors

  • Yeun Hong,

    1. Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, and Institute of Life Sciences and Resources, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Hee-Seok Yang,

    1. Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, and Institute of Life Sciences and Resources, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jingmei Li,

    1. Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, and Institute of Life Sciences and Resources, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Seon-Kyeong Han,

    1. Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, and Institute of Life Sciences and Resources, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Hae-Choon Chang,

    1. Department of Food and Nutrition, Chosun University, Gwangju, Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Hae-Yeong Kim

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, and Institute of Life Sciences and Resources, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Korea
    • Correspondence to: Hae-Yeong Kim, Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, and Institute of Life Sciences and Resources, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446–701, Korea. E-mail: hykim@khu.ac.kr

    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in salted Chinese cabbage, the main ingredient of kimchi, were analyzed by culture-dependent sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), followed by sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and by culture-independent polymerase chain reaction–denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), followed by sequencing of the V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene. The results were compared to those of LAB that had previously been found in kimchi.

RESULTS

The two identification methods produced distinct overall LAB profiles. The PCR-DGGE method detected a more diverse microflora, including non-LAB strains. The culture-dependent method uniquely detected Weissella sp. and was able to provide the quantitative distribution of LAB in samples. However, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactobacillus curvatus and Leuconostoc carnosum, which had also been reported as the dominant LAB in kimchi in previous studies, were identified by both methods.

CONCLUSION

The two identification methods gave different bacterial profiles, while both methods were sufficient to identify the most prevalent LAB in salted Chinese cabbage samples. The quantitative feature of the culture-dependent identification method would make it preferable for studying and monitoring LAB viability in kimchi at each fermentation stage. The availability of the culture-independent identification method to identify a broader bacterial profile, including non-LAB, would make it a more effective tool for controlling contamination of undesirable bacteria during kimchi fermentation. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry

Ancillary