Does the spicing step affect the quality and drying behaviour of traditional kaddid, a Tunisian cured meat?

Authors

  • Meriem Chabbouh,

    1. Institut National Agronomique de Tunis, University of Carthage, Tunis, Tunisia
    2. Laboratoire d'Economie, Sciences et Technologies Alimentaires, Institut National Agronomique de Tunis (INAT)
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  • Ali Sahli,

    1. Institut National Agronomique de Tunis, University of Carthage, Tunis, Tunisia
    2. Laboratoire de Maîtrise des Technologies de l'Energie (LMTE), Centre de Recherche et des Technologies de l'Energie (CRTE), Hammam Lif, Tunisia
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  • Sihem Bellagha

    Corresponding author
    1. Institut National Agronomique de Tunis, University of Carthage, Tunis, Tunisia
    2. Laboratoire d'Economie, Sciences et Technologies Alimentaires, Institut National Agronomique de Tunis (INAT)
    • Correspondence to: Sihem Bellagha, Laboratoire d'Economie, Sciences et Technologies Alimentaires, Institut National Agronomique de Tunis (INAT), University of Carthage, 43 Av. Charles Nicolle, 1082 Tunis, Tunisia. E-mail: bellagha.sihemb@gmail.com

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Abstract

BACKGROUND

The effects of spicing on the physicochemical and microbial characteristics and drying behaviour of kaddid, a Tunisian dry-cured meat, were studied. In addition, the quality characteristics of traditional sun-dried kaddid and processed convective-dried kaddid were compared.

RESULTS

Spicing had no significant effect on the pH and water activity of brined beef meat at 21% (w/w), but it reduced the product water and salt contents. Effects of spicing on brined meat microbial flora were the appearance of sulfito-reducer bacteria, an increase in total mesophilic aerobic flora (+15%) and staphylococci (+26%) and a decrease in faecal coliforms (−23%). The salted beef meat sorption behaviour was affected by spicing. Besides, spicing increased the kaddid drying rate, allowing a significant decrease in the drying process time (−33%). Traditional and processed kaddid presented comparable microbial characteristics. Both drying methods led to a reduction in the number of total mesophilic aerobic flora in unspiced and spiced kaddid and of faecal coliforms in spiced kaddid.

CONCLUSION

The study showed that spicing, as a step in kaddid meat processing to enhance the final product flavour, caused changes in the salted meat physicochemical and microbial characteristics and accelerated the drying rate. Convective drying at 30 °C is recommended to produce kaddid having the same characteristics as the traditional product. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry

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