Traditional foods for health: screening of the antioxidant capacity and phenolic content of selected Black Sea area local foods

Authors

  • Francesca Danesi,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Agri-Food Sciences and Technologies, University of Bologna, Cesena, (FC), Italy
    • Correspondence to: Francesca Danesi, Campus of Food Science, University of Bologna, Piazza Goidanich 60, 47521 Cesena (FC), Italy. E-mail: francesca.danesi@unibo.it

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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Federica Pasini,

    1. Department of Agri-Food Sciences and Technologies, University of Bologna, Cesena, (FC), Italy
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Maria Fiorenza Caboni,

    1. Department of Agri-Food Sciences and Technologies, University of Bologna, Cesena, (FC), Italy
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  • Luigi Filippo D'Antuono,

    1. Department of Agri-Food Sciences and Technologies, University of Bologna, Cesena, (FC), Italy
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  • Alessandra Bordoni on behalf of the BaSeFood Consortium

    1. Department of Agri-Food Sciences and Technologies, University of Bologna, Cesena, (FC), Italy
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Abstract

BACKGROUND

The nutritional characteristics of the Black Sea area (BSA) traditional foods are almost unknown, and they could be interesting sources of antioxidant compounds. In this study, carried out within the BaSeFood project, the in vitro total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and phenolic content of 39 BSA traditional foods were determined using different assays.

RESULTS

An ample range of TAC and phenolics content was detected in the examined foods that were ranked according to their scavenging activity expressed per weight unit and per serving size. Based on serving size, the highest TAC was in the order blueberries > nettle soup > sunflower seeds, and the fruits/fruit-based foods group was the one having the highest activity. Correlation analysis evidenced that the TAC is highly dependent on total phenolic content, while hydroxycinnamic acids and compounds having o-diphenolic structure did not show specific prominent effects. Finally, correlations between the two methods used for measuring the TAC suggest that they are both suitable in a wide range of foods.

CONCLUSION

Our data represent the first contribution to further research on the health effects of BSA traditional foods. This could enhance the interest of consumers, with potential benefits to stakeholders at all levels of the production chain. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry

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