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Antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Glossogyne tenuifolia against selected pathogens

Authors

  • Tsung-Shi Yang,

    1. Department of Cosmeceutics, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
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    • Tsung-Shi Yang and Louis Kuop-Ping Chao contributed equally to this work.
  • Louis Kuo-Ping Chao,

    1. Department of Cosmeceutics, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
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    • Tsung-Shi Yang and Louis Kuop-Ping Chao contributed equally to this work.
  • Tai-Ti Liu

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Food Science, Yuanpei University, Hsinchu, Taiwan
    • Correspondence to: Tai-Ti Liu, Department of Food Science, Yuanpei University, No. 306 Yuanpei Street, Hsinchu 30015, Taiwan. E-mail: taiti@mail.ypu.edu.tw

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Abstract

BACKGROUND

Glossogyne tenuifolia (GT) is a perennial herb widely distributed in the areas from south Asia to Australia. Many biological effects of G. tenuifolia have been reported; however, the information about antimicrobial activity of the essential oil (EO) of the herb remains unavailable. Therefore, the aims of this study were to investigate the antimicrobial activity of the GT-EO in vitro and food systems, the antimicrobial impact (AI) of its individual compounds, and interactive effects of major active compounds (linalool, 4-terpineol, α-terpineol, ρ-cymene) on selected Gram-positive (S. aureus, L. monocytogenes, S. mutans and S. sanguinis) and Gram-negative (E. coli O157:H7, V. parahaemolyticus and S. enterica) pathogens.

RESULTS

The minimal microbicidal concentration (MMC) of the GT-EO ranged from 0.75 to 12 mg mL−1 against the test bacteria in vitro. Except for L. monocytogenes, the GT-EO exhibited more inhibitory effect on the selected Gram positive than against the Gram negative bacteria at the GT-EO concentrations ≤ 12 mg mL−1. The interactive effects of major active compounds (linalool, 4-terpineol, α-terpineol, ρ-cymene) are additive instead of synergistic via the checkerboard analysis. The bacteria with a microbial load of ca. 102 CFU mL−1 in the milk tea could be completely inactivated by the GT-EO with the MMC of 1.5 mg mL−1.

CONCLUSION

ρ-Cymene is the largest component in the GT-EO; however, it is not the compound predominantly affecting the entire antimicrobial activity of the EO. Instead, 4-terpineol is the most influential among the test compounds that contribute to the antimicrobial activity of the GT-EO. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry

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