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Tumor microenvironment and progression

Authors

  • Harold F. Dvorak MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pathology, Center for Vascular Biology Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
    • Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Ave. RN227c, Boston, MA 02215. Fax: 617-667-2913.
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  • Valerie M. Weaver PhD,

    1. Department of Surgery & Anatomy, Center for Bioengineering and Tissue Regeneration, University of California, San Francisco, California
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  • Thea D. Tlsty PhD,

    1. Department of Pathology, University of California, San Francisco, California
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  • Gabriele Bergers PhD

    1. Department of Neurological Surgery and Anatomy, Helen Diller Family Cancer Research Building, University of California, San Francisco, California
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Abstract

Tumor blood vessels are heterogeneous, of at least six distinct types, are induced primarily by vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), and provide a potentially useful therapeutic target. Breast cancer is characterized by changes in the microenvironment that result in altered tensional homeostasis. Also, breast cancers arise as the result of epigenetic as well as genetic changes. Tumor blood vessel pericytes result, in part, from bone marrow precursor cells, and VEGF is a negative regulator of glioblastoma tumor cell invasion. J. Surg. Oncol. 2011;103:468–474. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Ancillary